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Photographic Sweep Stand

by HPaul, published

Photographic Sweep Stand by HPaul Jun 20, 2013

Description

This was inspired by "Paper Clip to set up simple photo background" thingiverse.com/thing:95180 The curves of slepcat's design are a great idea, but I wanted to use heavier paper than the slots accommodated, and I wished the paper wouldn't come out of the slots so easily. I also wanted a sweep that could stand on its own with more stability.

Although not as elegant as the original, the stand in this design holds thin paper well and also allows for thicker sheets. The rear post helps support a higher background, and there is a plate behind the sweep that can be weighted for added stability.

Please see Instructions for assembly notes.

Recent Comments

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nice object ! have print in abs .. good result and fonctionnaly .. ! thks .!!

I agree.
This object is not efficient.
Same problems as 85miles.
Need to be reworked.

I found this print to have frustrating results, pin was too small and easily falls out, had to re-scale up to have snug fit with glue. Also the closing mechanism does not snugly secure paper, even with card stock its still a loose fit and during positioning they often come apart and paper falls out. Would have been nice to have these with a fine tolerance.

Neat idea though.

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Instructions

I used 30% fill and it was more than strong enough. (All pieces are printed with zero extra shells.) The platens are both on a single plate; print them with 100% fill and print the pin twice at 100% fill also. Printing each pin independently yields cleaner prints. The platens attach to the stands as shown using the the pins which go through the holes in the stands and are a force fit into the receiving holes of the platens. A spot of super glue at the platen end of the pin will make it permanent.

To use, open the platen and feed the paper between the pivot and the stand. Holding the paper against the stand, close the platen and secure it under the hook on the stand.

The flat plates behind the curves are for weights which are needed for heavier paper. If you plan to use only one size of paper, gluing the stands to a stiff cardboard or foam-core board will make the setup easier and even more stable.

Comments

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rvbob67 on Mar 13, 2014 said:

nice object ! have print in abs .. good result and fonctionnaly .. ! thks .!!

85miles on Oct 4, 2013 said:

I found this print to have frustrating results, pin was too small and easily falls out, had to re-scale up to have snug fit with glue. Also the closing mechanism does not snugly secure paper, even with card stock its still a loose fit and during positioning they often come apart and paper falls out. Would have been nice to have these with a fine tolerance.

Neat idea though.

Wufnir on Oct 21, 2013 said:

I agree.
This object is not efficient.
Same problems as 85miles.
Need to be reworked.

banksy on Sep 11, 2013 said:

Regarding the PIN:
Perhaps you could use filament as the pin. Pins can easily be created by snipping a piece of filament.. roll it on your hot bed until its nice and straight & then up end it, heat it up & push down on the end to create the rivet head.
( got this method from Maker magazine )

jyeh_tw on Aug 18, 2013 said:

HPaul, May I have left side Paper_Sweep_Stand file ?
Thanks.

jackalope on Jul 6, 2013 said:

thanks man!

falken76 on Jul 3, 2013 said:

What am I doing wrong? The pins print out too thin, they are not force fit, so the platens fall off of the stands. If I put glue on it, I wouldn't be able to open the stand to fit paper in.

HPaul on Jul 3, 2013 said:

This is the first I've heard of this as a problem. Have you changed the scale in your slicing application?
You can also use bolts to hold the pieces together; use a second nut as a locknut to adjust the tension..

FatalDischarge on Jun 21, 2013 said:

This will fix all of your problems: http://www.netfabb.com/cloud/.

MacGyver on Jun 21, 2013 said:

The back side of the arch is not manifold, not that it really affects the final output. My printer prints that back arc as a separate piece from the main piece if that makes any sense. They are so close that the plastic actually adheres though.

HPaul on Jun 21, 2013 said:

Yes, I saw that too. I'm not sure why the .stl prints out that way, since MeshLab shows all faces as manifold. As you say, it doesn't affect the final output so I didn't try to change the file.

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