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Scalable multitool pouch/sheath

by SuperInfraMan, published

Scalable multitool pouch/sheath by SuperInfraMan Jul 1, 2013

Description

This is a scalable version of the carrying pouch I've made for my Leatherman Wave. I've made these for years and it's the handiest design I've come up with. I am in the process of re-making it since my last one was lost :-( so I decided to publish it here.

It's a bit weird for Thingiverse since you don't need a CNC device to make it, but it's a scalable digital file, so I guess it belongs.

Opens in Inkscape. A video on the actual construction will follow.

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Instructions

Select the pattern in the middle and scale the X and Y to fit your multitool. It has very little "ease-" (fits tightly).

Scale it mathematically from the length and width of your preferred multitool- the Wave is 4" long by 1.5" wide by 1/2" thick. Scale the Y by the length of the multitool, scale the X by the sum of the width and thickness. (So if the tool is 4.5" long, scale the Y to 112.5%). Print it out.

Add ~3/8" seam allowance all the way around and cut it out of ballistic nylon, canvas, or other heavy material.

Cut reinforcement, webbing, and velcro to the new scaled lengths. The standard 3/4" width should be fine for most things unless you scale it down so far you need to use 1/2" wide webbing and velcro instead. Likewise scale the partially-shown long webbing designated by an "X".

Fold over and finish the two short ends, then sew on the velcro and webbing bits (zigzags on the pattern represent bar-tacking to hold the webbing on), fold it in half and sew the long edges.

In use, the long webbing strap goes behind your belt, underneath the cross-ways webbing, then up and over to attach to the top flap and then to the velcro down the front. This allows you to put it on and take it off w/o removing your belt, but it can't fall off like a clip can.

It also allows you to pass the long strap obliquely through a belt loop at the same time so that it can't migrate back and forth when you're crawling around in an attic or crawlspace. This makes it hang somewhat obliquely so you don't get poked in the spleen when you bend over or squat.

If this doesn't make sense the video will be coming along just as soon as I can get it shot.

Inspired by a nameless tool holder I had about 25 years ago; it eventually wore out and I've been making them ever since.

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