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Cooling Fan

by catarina, published

Cooling Fan by catarina Dec 15, 2009

Featured Thing!

Description

The base fits a DC motor with 20mm in diameter but its dimensions can be adjusted on the openscad script.

This is a work in progress. The plastic is so lightweight that it doesn't counteract the pull of the motor and I'm hoping it'll eventually work as a mini propeller (test video: vimeo.com/8199151). But for now it really is just a cooling/exhaust fan which can be held still by either bolting it down or using the 9V battery version - the weight of the battery is enough to keep it from moving, specially if placed on a rubbery surface.

Recent Comments

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Lol, if I were ever to be queen of something, parametric would be my first choice. Thanks :)

One of the things I enjoy most about openSCAD is how simple it is and how quickly it allows you to turn an idea into a model into an object into a project. But if I can find some free time in the near future, I'll definitely want to look into pythonOCC, and will probably be bugging you with questions...

Cool! I'd love to hear more about your work with turbines.
Before I had access to a 3D printer, I played around a bit with propellers and wind powered devices - without much success. This is the first time I got some not-too-discouraging results. I'm sure the blades can be optimized for that purpose. Even for the fan, they should be slightly curved and not perfectly straight as on my model. I just wanted to run a quick test without spending too much time coding and perfecting it. Still, I was surprised at how powerful this little fan turned out even without much attention to detail.

I dub thee Parametric Queen !

If you have a few hours to install and compile, the a few more hours to learn python and Open Cascade have a look at

http://pythonocc.org/

It's a python wrapper around OpenCascade , much more powerful than openscad but heaps more complicated. I'm just getting my teeth into it now.

:)

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Instructions

I'm sure this warning isn't necessary for most of you, but I'll feel better if I mention it anyway: make sure the shaft is tight and the fan is mounted snugly on the motor. If it's even a little bit loose the blades' piece might fly off and injure someone. Test it facing away from you and others.

Comments

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zignig on Dec 16, 2009 said:

I dub thee Parametric Queen !

If you have a few hours to install and compile, the a few more hours to learn python and Open Cascade have a look at

http://pythonocc.org/

It's a python wrapper around OpenCascade , much more powerful than openscad but heaps more complicated. I'm just getting my teeth into it now.

:)

catarina on Dec 16, 2009 said:

Lol, if I were ever to be queen of something, parametric would be my first choice. Thanks :)

One of the things I enjoy most about openSCAD is how simple it is and how quickly it allows you to turn an idea into a model into an object into a project. But if I can find some free time in the near future, I'll definitely want to look into pythonOCC, and will probably be bugging you with questions...

cathalgarvey on Dec 16, 2009 said:

Wow! Very, very cool! I've been looking at making a turbine blade for the opposite- project-scale wind or hydro power. This little prop will go a long way towards that!

Thanks!

catarina on Dec 16, 2009 said:

Cool! I'd love to hear more about your work with turbines.
Before I had access to a 3D printer, I played around a bit with propellers and wind powered devices - without much success. This is the first time I got some not-too-discouraging results. I'm sure the blades can be optimized for that purpose. Even for the fan, they should be slightly curved and not perfectly straight as on my model. I just wanted to run a quick test without spending too much time coding and perfecting it. Still, I was surprised at how powerful this little fan turned out even without much attention to detail.

Anonymous on Dec 16, 2009 said:

That is hella clever!

peter on Dec 16, 2009 said:

So, So cool!

MakerBot on Dec 15, 2009 said:

this is an awesome, practical item. seriously cool!

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