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Planetary gear

by ngoodger, published

Planetary gear by ngoodger Mar 6, 2014
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36854Views 13167Downloads Found in 3D Printing
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Summary

Youtube link: http://youtu.be/m3w0liy-QJE

3d printed planetary gear with gear bearings connecting the carrier to the gear planets. This allows (potentially) for reduced frictional losses in comparison to sleeve bearing.

The design is a extension of Emmett Lalish's innovative gear bearing http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:53451 and also uses his pin connectors V3 library http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:33790.

The gear ratio is written on the using HarlanDMii Write library http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:16193

Instructions

Print the carrier and the planetary gear separately and assemble.

The included gear.stl uses a 0.15mm tolerance which may or may not enough for your printer. It can be adjusted in the openscad source file.

Material: 1.75mm Blue and red PLA from Colorfabb

Slicing settings

Slicer: Kisslicer
Number of loops: 2
Layer thickness: 0.2mm
Extrusion width: 0.5mm
Infill: 33%
Extrusion temperature: 195deg
Bed temperature: 50deg
Perimeter speed: 20mm/s
Solid infill: 30mm/s
Sparse infill: 50mm/s

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Hello. Thank you for your awesome work. I've just finished a print using an old Mendel, using PLA, and it is awesome! I used a hot air gun to soften the arms then popped it together. The clearances are just right for my model. None of the gears, after the first layer, were fused together.

I do have a question. I'm not a regular user of Openscad and the scad file contains the parts but not in an assembled state, right?

Thanks. Happy to hear you managed to print it. It has been a while so I can't recall the details regarding Openscad. The gear itself should be assembled. By that I mean all the parts positioned relative to each other correctly.

im not getting the pins and its stuck
HELP

The write.scad and pins.scad are in the libraries linked in the description.

Hi, Could you include the files Write.scad and pins.scad that are referenced in your SCAD file?

Tell me if you dislike, but I used your picture (with credits), in the last article of my tutorial to Openscad at http://www.tridimake.com/2014/11/how-to-use-openscad-4-children-and.html :)
Well done!!

Your page looks really good. I am happy you could use the photo :-)

This was my 3rd 3-D project. I really just downloaded and started printing before going off to bed. When I awoke, I was surprised to see the "fully assembled" gear there. I shaved it and the three planets spun fabulously. The axils came off when attaching to the carriage so I got some machine screws and started tapping them in. Then (I was excited and decaffeinated) the inner gears broke loose- I thought they were spokes. I used a star washer to hold the inner gear in place to the carriage. Amazing. Everyone at work loved it and half of them are buying a 3-D printer. We need them on all the conference tables! Cheers.

This was my 3rd 3-D project. I really just downloaded and started printing before going off to bed. When I awoke, I was surprised to see the "fully assembled" gear there. I shaved it and the three planets spun fabulously. The axils came off when attaching to the carriage so I got some machine screws and started tapping them in. Then (I was excited and decaffeinated) the inner gears broke loose- I thought they were spokes. I used a star washer to hold the inner gear in place to the carriage. Amazing. Everyone at work loved it and half of them are buying a 3-D printer. We need them on all the conference tables! Cheers.

Hi I have a problem with slicer3 by slicing the gear. Everything works fine until Slicer3 begins "Exporting G-code" then it freezes. I waited almost 2 hours but nothing happened :( Does anyone have a solution for that?

Use a different slicing program, like Cura. I've noticed that slicer very, very slow for me. Cura in near instantaneous in comparison.

Like the desing - thanks for posting it - it's printing right now, barelly half way through but I can already see that it will be a bit hard (if not impossible) to separate the "fused" gears after printing ... might end up as nice designer paper weight instead (printing in yellow PLA). What I think would help if the first few layers (lets say 0.4 - 0.5 mm) as well as top ones (minus the pegs) will be set to have extra tolerance - I'd say 0.25 to 0.30 mm will do just fine - to allow for easier split of the gears after print. I'm also suffering from small details like pegs / connector pins being "melted" when printed on their own (like in this design) without any other surrounding (parts of the) objects so it ends up as big ugly warped blob of plastic which needs lot of filing and cleaning to make it to it's functional shape. I've tried everything from adding second cooling fan, decreasing the printing speed in affected areas and hot end temperature for those section to lowest possible point at which plastic still flows but to no avail. Basically the small bits are being constantly overheated / have no time to cool down. As a workaround I'm using a "side" auxilary object of the same hight to let print head move away from the pegs and "waste" plastic on it while layers cools down on the pegs. Any suggestion in regards of that? This is for PLA - haven't tried yet printing small isolated parts in ABS or HIPS.

Glad you liked the design :-) I think you need a pretty well calibrated printer to print this design. I made a few paper weights before I succeeded. If you haven't already done it I would start with Emmet's gear bearing. Much less wasted plastic if it fails. You might be right about the extra tolerance but I don't think it is necessary with a well calibrated printed (level bed, low bed temperature). There are 3 pins on the included stl gear so they are not on their own? I printed in PLA and didn't have any problems printing the pins. I don't even use a cooling fan.

Glad you liked the design :-) I think you need a pretty well calibrated printer to print this design. I made a few paper weights before I succeeded ;-) You might be right about the extra tolerance on the top and bottom but i think if the printer is well calibrated it is not necessary (level bed, correct temperature ect). If you haven't already successfully printed Emmett's gear bearing I would start with that. Much less wasted plastic if it fails. Regarding the pins melting I have the same problem if they are printed on their own. But in the included stl files there are 3 pins so they should have time to cool? I didn't experience any problems there. I don't even use a cooling fan.

Hi, thanks for the prompt reply. I'm still scoping through the SCAD file to see if I'll manage to adjust the tolerance towards both bottom and end of the main body to gradually transpose from 0.25 to 0.15 accross the first 0.5 mm and vice versa accross the last 0.5 mm. I believe I have the printer quite well adjusted already however I do use higher temperature of the bed for the first layer to assure it will stick well so I can try to derease that to see it that would help in this case. I print at 0.1 layers with first one at 0.2. Alternativelly I might just try to increase the overall tolerance to 0.20 or 0.25 but I don't want to end up with separated but too "wobbly" gears in the end ... Maybe it would be usefull to include "test" STL with only one small and not as tall inside planet gear to check how well is the printer capable of printing on given tolerance? It would be less time and plastic wasted this way.
In regards of the pegs / pins - I was printing the smal board holder with four pins and they still get melted pretty baddly (this one: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:167434)http://www.thingiverse.com/thi....

Arduino Holder
by zefram

The first one I printed fused in the middle but I guess if you are having problems towards the top and bottom the increased tolerance might help. I tried printing one with 0.2mm tolerance after that and it worked great but I found that the planets inside the gear bearing sometimes moved around and then would get stuck on each other. So the tolerance had to be 0.15 or I guess you could also change the parameters so the teeth are longer. I was extruding slightly too much plastic which is why it fused on my first attempt. That link doesn't seem to exist on Thingiverse.

I've "corrected" the link (it didn't like the closing bracket right after it so I've added space there) and added the th
ing number as well. So - I have aborted the print just few moments ago about 3/4 of the way because the head bumped into one of the small inner gears during the non-print move and the whole print shifted out of sync in Y direction by a couple of milimeterd (FUMING!) and the gears indeed are stuck like hell - no way of spliting them apart without breaking the whole piece in bits so paperweight as expect however unfinished ... So now I'm trying to figure out what would be better - to slightly decrease the extrusion factor or to try to increase tolerance ...
Would you mind sharing the slicer settings you've used to pring this out? Thanks!

I had a look at the link. It seems odd the pins there should be melting when there are 4 of them. Maybe the extrusion temperature or the print speed. Sucks that the print failed but maybe there was not much point continuing anyway if the gears are fused. It is certainly possible to print at a 0.15mm. joefe just printed it and said it moved freely without even having to break it apart! Jealous of that printer. I added the slicer settings I used to the instructions. Good luck!

Thank for posting the slicer details. I've in the meantime decreased the bed and extrusion temperatures a little bit but I doubt hose would help much anyway and also used lower extrusion coeficient - changed it from 1.1 to 1 and re-build the STL with tolerance of 0.18 and tried to print first 1 mm (9 layers) of the gear. It definitelly looks better now - I can see that hexagonal holes are larger vissibly but still not large enough to fit the alen key of matching size and gears are still touching / melting althoug there is now visible border rather than one melted area as before. So once back home today I'll try to further decrease the extrusion (to 0.95) and maybe also re-create the gear with 0.2 tolerance to see if that help. I refuse to give up on this - it's such great design that I simply must make it work. It's also a good "test" of how well is your printer calibrated so even with some extra plastic "wasted" on paperweights it's well worth it.

Coooooool .. Thanks for this .. added some "called hebel in german"

You are most welcome :-) Thanks for adding to it.

Fabulously Fractal.

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