Loading

Fume Scrubber

by unitconversion, published

Fume Scrubber by unitconversion Aug 9, 2012

Description

This is a simple fume scrubber to help get rid of ABS fumes. It's intended to go inside of a heated build environment and keep the interior fume levels down without wasting heat by blowing them out.

Recent Comments

view all
if you google the MSDS of ABS it will point you towards using a organic filter to protect your self.
I googled a bit and found out the following:

Activated charcoal is good at trapping other carbon-based impurities ("organic" chemicals), as well as things like chlorine. Many other chemicals are not attracted to carbon at all -- sodium, nitrates, etc. -- so they pass right through. This means that an activated charcoal filter will remove certain impurities while ignoring others

science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/question209.htm

ABS fumes ar non organic as far as I know, so maybee the chemicals just pass through the filter making it useless?

Maybe it does removes the bad smell, but that does of cours not mean that all the chimicals are filtert.....
Does anyone knows how effective this active charcoal is to filter the ABS fumes? Chanes are that some chemicals get through the filter? Maybe there are different types of charcoal (i saw you are using charcoal for a waterfilter, dont know if this is as effective when using in airfilters?)

I think I wil build an enclosure with a fan that sucks the fumes out through a hose, and hang the hose out of a window. Less practical and you suck away warm air, but you are quite sure you get rid of all the fumes.

More from 3D Printer Accessories

view more

Liked By

view all

Give a Shout Out

If you print this Thing and display it in public proudly give attribution by printing and displaying this tag. Print Thing Tag

Instructions

The fan_mount_v2.scad file from thingiverse.com/thing:18273 is used. Either version of the scrubber just uses bulk activated charcoal (such as this: amazon.com/Acurel-LLC-Economy-Activated-Pellets/dp/B000YIWT0M/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1344565074&sr=8-2&keywords=activated+charcoal ) and can be attached with self-adhesive velcro. The STL files are for 40mm fans.

Version 3 (Round):
This one requires no filter material, you just pour some charcoal in the top. It works much better than v2, but is harder to print; slic3r wants to print the filter grid as a series of squares rather than as a grid. To counteract this, I offset the x and y lines in the z direction so that you get the first layer as a support and it seems to work for me. If you have a nozzle fan (I don't yet) I think this would work wonderfully.

I will probably be experimenting with different screen designs to see what prints the best. I'm fairly sure the best thing will be to have non-intersecting criss-crossing bars. That way slic3r should have it draw the x lines on one layer and the y lines on the next, then repeating.

Version 2 (Rectangular):
To use this you put a small piece of filter material between the grate and the fan and then fill the top with bulk activated charcoal and then put a small piece of filter in the top to plug the hole and mount. If your fan doesn't have a built-in guard (an X across it is enough, just not open) you'll probably want an external one between it and the filter to keep the filter out of it.

Version 1 (N/A):
This was abandoned and never uploaded. It would have been similar to V3.
if you google the MSDS of ABS it will point you towards using a organic filter to protect your self.
I googled a bit and found out the following:

Activated charcoal is good at trapping other carbon-based impurities ("organic" chemicals), as well as things like chlorine. Many other chemicals are not attracted to carbon at all -- sodium, nitrates, etc. -- so they pass right through. This means that an activated charcoal filter will remove certain impurities while ignoring others

science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/question209.htm

ABS fumes ar non organic as far as I know, so maybee the chemicals just pass through the filter making it useless?

Maybe it does removes the bad smell, but that does of cours not mean that all the chimicals are filtert.....
Does anyone knows how effective this active charcoal is to filter the ABS fumes? Chanes are that some chemicals get through the filter? Maybe there are different types of charcoal (i saw you are using charcoal for a waterfilter, dont know if this is as effective when using in airfilters?)

I think I wil build an enclosure with a fan that sucks the fumes out through a hose, and hang the hose out of a window. Less practical and you suck away warm air, but you are quite sure you get rid of all the fumes.
Of course, this thing would work *any*where fumes are a problem. Say as an overhead solder fume extractor. 
Is that velcro you're using to attach the air filter to the inside of your 3d printer's enclosure? If so, what are you using to stick the velcro to your air filter and to the inside of your 3d printer's enclosure? What type of glue are you using?

You've used it to print lots of stuff and the velcro holds?

Thanks 8-)
I'm using the self-adhesive velcro (like this: amazon.com/Velcro-Products-Industrial-Sticky-Back-positioning/dp/B004E2IADO/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8
&
amp;qid=1345424946
&
amp;sr=8-3
&
amp;keywords=velcro+industrial+sticky+back ). It works really well and as little as the parts weigh, I haven't had any problems with them falling.
Do you use the fan at full blast or use a microcontroller and / or a stepper motor?
I just run it full blast with the 40mm fan wired straight to 12v power. The design is fairly restrictive so you don't get a whole lot of flow out of it, but it still works pretty well. I'm in the process of coming up with a new design with a higher filter surface area.
This is such a good idea...

How much filament before you need to replace the carbon?
Not sure yet, but I have to imagine the little carton I got at walmart is going to be a lifetime supply.
Top