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Canning Jar Sprouting Lid

by AlexEnglish, published

Canning Jar Sprouting Lid by AlexEnglish Aug 17, 2012

Featured Thing!

Description

Use this to make radish, clover, bean, and other healthy, tasty sprouts.

While I had the idea back when I made my original canning jar lid and started working on accessories, the Germinator Cover by konato is what motivated me to find a good way to print it without relying on infill settings.

I had shelved the project for a while because I hadn't had time to implement a screen like I wanted, but then came along the fine mesh screen by Wauter. Wauter did a great job of something I had only gotten half-working.

This thing is a part of a collection of things featured in this post: protoparadigm.com/blog/2012/08/what-to-do-with-a-3d-printer-make-canning-jar-accessories/

Recent Comments

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Fantastic! Please take some photos, I'd love to see this.

printing these as wedding party favours

Hey, glad that worked out. This was a fun one.

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Instructions

To Print: You'll need to use the print settings these STLs were built for, namely a 0.2mm layer height, and a 0.45mm tracewidth. Those parameters should be configurable in most slicing applications.

If you want to print with different settings, you'll need to grab the scad file, change the variables for layer height and tracewidth and compile it yourself. You'll need the canning jar lid and the fine mesh files that this thing is a derivative of. Make sure to read the comments in the scad file.

When you take the part off your bed you'll have to take care to keep from ripping the mesh. If you have a removable bed, take it straight off the printer and put it in the freezer. Your part will come off very easily with no stress to the mesh. If you don't have a removable bed, just make sure you've allowed your bed to cool completely after the print before you try to remove the lid.

To Sprout: Use whatever sprouting seeds you like. My favorites are mung beans (for bean sprouts), alfalfa, and a blend I buy that contains radish, alfalfa, cabbage, clover, and a few others.

I highly recommend using a wide-mouth jar for this, as it will drain much faster with the increased surface area. use a jar of whatever size you want, depending on what you've got available and how many seeds you want to sprout at once.

You can get sprouting seeds at health food stores, online, and at some grocery stores. They should have sprouting instructions, but if they don't, or if they apply to a proprietary sprouter, follow the instructions below for everything but chia (chia is a mystery, I can't get them to sprout well).

Add your seeds (try starting with one tablespoon, it doesn't seem like much, but you'll be surprised) and some lukewarm water. Soak for 4 to 8 hours, then drain, rinse (pour water through the mesh, and drain through the mesh), and let stand for 12 to 24 hours at room temperature out of direct sunlight. Rinse every 12 to 24 hours. Once the sprouts have grown to the desired size move to the refrigerator and rinse every other day to keep them from getting slimy. They'll stay good for quite some time if properly rinsed and as long as they aren't sealed (keep using the screen cap, don't seal airtight).

Enjoy on sandwiches, wraps, salads, and stirfrys (for the bean sprouts).

Comments

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driggers on Jun 15, 2013 said:

printing these as wedding party favours

AlexEnglish on Jun 16, 2013 said:

Fantastic! Please take some photos, I'd love to see this.

TheNewHobbyist on Aug 17, 2012 said:

This was on my "to design" list. Thanks for doing the heavy lifting for me!

AlexEnglish on Aug 18, 2012 said:

Hey, glad that worked out. This was a fun one.

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