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hydropw1 - a micro hydropower generator

by kaz_at_Capsellab, published

hydropw1 - a micro hydropower generator by kaz_at_Capsellab Nov 18, 2012

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Description

After Tohoku Japan Earthquake(March 11th, 2011), Japanese people need alternative energy sources to nuclear power plants.
Micro hydropower generation is an answer, and we've designed it.
We changed our license to Creative Commons - Attribution License.
We hope YOU to improve our design.
Thanks!
More information: capsellab.com/

Recent Comments

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Thanks yzorg!

I'm glad to see you deriving this thing :)

Casual rain-power generator with no installation work is a nice idea!

nice idea!
but what about the people in suburban places where no open water streams are accessible.

Maybe we could derive a variant of this generator that can be lowered into a constant running sewerstream or beeing put into the down-spouts from big buildings roofs.

Then It only works when its raining.. but power is power and there are places where it rains a lot. (where the monsun rains occur or the city Bergen with 248 rain days per year ;)

just use the better hub dynamos (aka "the more expensive ones")..
they will have sealed bearings. plus they usually pack more power.

to add some waterproofness ontop fill the entire hub with a thick underwater-grade grease.

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Instructions

"hydropw1" is a micro hydoropower generator.

We use SHIMANO's hub dynamo Nexus DH-2N30J as generator.

"hydropw1.dxf" is its assembly 3d model.
"helix01-r3.stl" is its helix-shaped screw section only. Our helix-shaped screw section is made for 3D printers, made by nylon.
"hydropw1_electric_circuits1.bmp" is a 2D electric circuits drawing file(bitmap), such as 5V USB-OUTPUT and 100V AC-OUTPUT on Flickr.: flickr.com/photos/83659424@N02/8667101710/

The other parts are made by stainless steel.

Also you colud see the video that we did the first field-test of "hydropw1" on flickr - URL: flickr.com/photos/83659424@N02/8004530060/


The size of "hydropw1" is 0.25m in width, 0.30m in height, 0.3m in depth.
And, we use SHIMANO's hub-dynamo as power generator, so its power output is 3.0watt maximum, according to their catalog.

Thank you.

Comments

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yzorg on May 25, 2013 said:

nice idea!
but what about the people in suburban places where no open water streams are accessible.

Maybe we could derive a variant of this generator that can be lowered into a constant running sewerstream or beeing put into the down-spouts from big buildings roofs.

Then It only works when its raining.. but power is power and there are places where it rains a lot. (where the monsun rains occur or the city Bergen with 248 rain days per year ;)

kaz_at_Capsellab on May 26, 2013 said:

Thanks yzorg!

I'm glad to see you deriving this thing :)

Casual rain-power generator with no installation work is a nice idea!

kaz_at_Capsellab on Apr 6, 2013 said:

Thanks Cheech!
I've imagined that cross-flow turbines need higher head, more the current of water, than helix type screws. But I must change my thought.

I am looking forward to your ideas to the public!

Cheech on Apr 5, 2013 said:

Perhaps a cross-flow turbine will give you more efficiency for low speed, low head flow. Something similar to a vertical-axis wind turbine, but strengthened for use in water.

I am currently doing serious research on this in my university. As soon as I finish and test 3D printed models, I will release them to the public.

MoonCactus on Apr 5, 2013 said:

Nice idea since the Savonius kind indeed works better at low RPM. This project is outstanding nonetheless, keep on! :)

kaz_at_Capsellab on Apr 2, 2013 said:

Thanks Ktronik!

We will modify the drawbacks in the next design.

Ktronik on Mar 31, 2013 said:

hub under water means bearings won't last long, as hub bearings are not sealed

yzorg on May 25, 2013 said:

just use the better hub dynamos (aka "the more expensive ones")..
they will have sealed bearings. plus they usually pack more power.

to add some waterproofness ontop fill the entire hub with a thick underwater-grade grease.

Ktronik on Mar 31, 2013 said:

easy to boost power output of hub to 7-10w, buy adding a 100-200uF bi-polar cap, in series to the main on side of the AC output, but before the rectifier

Ktronik on Apr 13, 2013 said:

I have full circuits for LED lighting systems and battery chargers from dynamo hub... please drop me a line for more details, also I am the a dealer for SP dynamo hubs, great hubs, for a cheap price!! please let me know if you need hubs or circuits for electronics...K

kaz_at_Capsellab on Nov 20, 2012 said:

Thanks Asger!
We revised our license from Attribution-Sare-Alike License to Attribution License, so we will not take credit for anything.

and..We believe that open source hardware can advance DIY free energy technology.
And we believe that everyone who loves DIY making can receive the fruits of open source hardware community's effort, if they keep the license.
Anyone can contribute to improve our design, Anyone can sell  products that use our design.

We hope to make more hydro-efficient screws, more high-powered generators, cheaper but robuster frames. 
Of course we want batteries, outlets and wireless monitoring devices.

Imagine that, a network of 10 micro hydropower generators with cool design, will feed electricity to your home in the future.

We hope you to help us.

Asger on Nov 21, 2012 said:

If easy to build and cheap readily-available materials is the goal, why make use of printed screws and stainless steel?

if i had water like that in my backyard i would just build this
http://www.green-trust.org/Des...

Everyone has plywood, nails an hammers, and every cornor of the earth has scrapyards/spare part dealers with tons, and tons of alternators and batteries. Not the case with 3d printers big enough to print that screw

lionelhives on Nov 20, 2012 said:

naive question but would domestic waterflow be enough to generate a little power? i.e. how much energy would be generated from running a bath, enough to power the heater which treats the water?

kaz_at_Capsellab on Nov 20, 2012 said:

Hi, lionelhives!
To rotate helix shaped screw, we need continuous water flow like a river, not like a sea tidal wave.
And our SHIMANO's hub dynamo is too power-short to heat water.
We are afraid, we don't think that can be possible.
Thank you.

Asger on Nov 20, 2012 said:

I think it might be too early to take credit for ending the quest for free energy

tuncayd on Nov 19, 2012 said:

how about using series of propellers (5 of them maybe) and connecting each one of them to a dynamo?

water flow will be enough to turn each propeller and the device can produce 5 times more energy..

kaz_at_Capsellab on Nov 19, 2012 said:

Thanks, tuncayd!
We think your idea is good!
We designed screw and generator are equal in rotation.
But we want more rotation of generator somehow....
May be your idea could help us.

kaz_at_Capsellab on Nov 19, 2012 said:

Hi, Jhack82!
We think SHIMANO's Nexus DH-2N30 Nut Type fit to "hydropw1" design. 
the URL is: http://techdocs.shimano.com/me...

Your "waterproof cell phone charge" idea is so nice!
We are preparing for the DIY battery case that uses with "hydropw1", but We think your idea is far better.
Thank you!

Jhack82 on Nov 19, 2012 said:

Hello, I tried to find your nexus dynamo and didn't see it online, could you provide a link to where it is available?, this is a great design and your video does a great job of showing how its works, is there a place to get eh dynamo? I can see a few of these in a bank being used to charge a cell phone in a waterproof container of course! great build and thanks for sharing!

kaz_at_Capsellab on Nov 19, 2012 said:

Thanks, Fraghard!
The size of "hydropw1" is 0.25m in width, 0.30m in height, 0.3m in depth.
And, we use SHIMANO's hub-dynamo as power generator, so its power output is 3.0w maximum, according to their catalog.

Fraghard on Nov 19, 2012 said:

Looks cool!!! Hard to tell from the pic but how big is this unit? Looks scalable too.
Do you have any data on power generation yet?

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