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L-Cheapo Laser Cutter Parts

by spiritplumber, published

L-Cheapo Laser Cutter Parts by spiritplumber Jun 5, 2014

Description

http://robots-everywhere.com/re_wiki/index.php?n=Main.LCheapo How to make (or buy) the L-Cheapo here, with photos and schematics.
The L-Cheapo is a laser cutter 3d printer accessory that will cut up to 3/16" wood or acrylic. It is in the process of being open sourced, so we're releasing the working drawings here.
The jig for making the heatsink is demoed here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1olPQ63jgbc

Recent Comments

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I'm familiar with printer build, printer operation, Gcode and axis direction. I have found no one able to replicate your results
on acrylic regardless of the number of passes, the height of the work piece, focal point, etc. etc. .
You must be truly gifted. LOL
I use a "blank" (copper covered) circuit board as a background material, that is enough to diffuse the beam.
A lot - 30~50. This is definitely for prototyping rather than production :) But it does work, and you can do mitering.

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Instructions

Zip-tie the fan to the upper end by the screw holes; zip-tie the PCB to to the middle; screw the heatsink in using the lower hole. Basically, see picture!
For the Solidoodle, you can use the Z screw holder with the kickstand to replace the stock screw holder.
For the generic mount, you'll have to come up with a kickstand appropriate for your printer.

I'm familiar with printer build, printer operation, Gcode and axis direction. I have found no one able to replicate your results on acrylic regardless of the number of passes, the height of the work piece, focal point, etc. etc. . You must be truly gifted. LOL

I've found no one able to duplicate your results on acrylic.

Hello! To cut acrylic or thick wood with the L-Cheapo, do multiple passes, and be sure to set Z scaling to -1 so that the build plate moves up rather than down. You will likely have to jog the Z axis down a little (the thickness of the workpiece) before hitting print.

<p>Very interesting. Never thought 2W diode lasers can be used to cut through something like 3/16 acrylic (like it shows on your http://indiegogo.com video). At what speed are you cutting and how many passes does it take?</p>

A lot - 30~50. This is definitely for prototyping rather than production :) But it does work, and you can do mitering.

<p>I'm following with interest, I know it's a work in progress but could you work in proper threaded screws for the heatsink\fixing to the mount as it sends a shiver down my spine recalling the guy that fitted a CD writer into his desktop PC using 1" long wood screws & wondered why we wouldn't warranty it.</p><p>Also is there a risk to the build plate (Replicator 2) once the laser has cut through the material or do you swap it out?</p><p>Manufacturing parts or assemblies isn't as cheap as doing something yourself, I produce a electronics unit in small quantities & I'm realistically making a loss on each one I produce due to the assembly time involved, if I had to pay someone then I'd have to charge a whole lot more.</p>

I use a "blank" (copper covered) circuit board as a background material, that is enough to diffuse the beam.

<p>Sorry if you don't mind me asking, but what makes up the cost of this other than the laser and power supply that can be found for about $90?( http://www.ebay.com/itm/638nm-300mw-Red-Module-12V-TTL-Laser-Moudle-Orange-Red-laser-beam-RL300-/121155969659?pt=US_Stage_Lighting_Parts_Accessories&amp;hash=item1c3575627b ) Isnt it possible to just hook the 12v output for the extruder right into this?</p>

<p>I had to set up a manufacturing line, hire a couple of people, etc. Making things in the US is expensive.</p><p>Also, most of those modules are intended to be on briefly (a few minutes at a time), not all the time.</p><p>Finally, note that the module you linked me is 0.3W and the L-Cheapo<br> is 2.1W -- this is why the L-Cheapo can actually cut plastic rather <br>than just engrave it; it's 7 times as powerful.</p>

<p>Awesome! thanks for being open about what is in your design, best of luck!</p>

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