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L-Cheapo Laser Cutter Parts

by spiritplumber, published

L-Cheapo Laser Cutter Parts by spiritplumber Jun 5, 2014

Description

igg.me/at/minilaser/

The L-Cheapo is a laser cutter 3d printer accessory that will cut up to 3/16" wood or acrylic. It is in the process of being open sourced, so we're releasing the working drawings here.

The jig for making the heatsink is demoed here: youtube.com/watch?v=1olPQ63jgbc

Recent Comments

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Very interesting. Never thought 2W diode lasers can be used to cut through something like 3/16 acrylic (like it shows on your indiegogo.com video). At what speed are you cutting and how many passes does it take?
I'm following with interest, I know it's a work in progress but could you work in proper threaded screws for the heatsinkfixing to the mount as it sends a shiver down my spine recalling the guy that fitted a CD writer into his desktop PC using 1" long wood screws & wondered why we wouldn't warranty it.Also is there a risk to the build plate (Replicator 2) once the laser has cut through the material or do you swap it out?Manufacturing parts or assemblies isn't as cheap as doing something yourself, I produce a electronics unit in small quantities & I'm realistically making a loss on each one I produce due to the assembly time involved, if I had to pay someone then I'd have to charge a whole lot more.
Awesome! thanks for being open about what is in your design, best of luck!

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Instructions

Zip-tie the fan to the upper end by the screw holes; zip-tie the PCB to to the middle; screw the heatsink in using the lower hole. Basically, see picture!

For the Solidoodle, you can use the Z screw holder with the kickstand to replace the stock screw holder.

For the generic mount, you'll have to come up with a kickstand appropriate for your printer.
Very interesting. Never thought 2W diode lasers can be used to cut through something like 3/16 acrylic (like it shows on your indiegogo.com video). At what speed are you cutting and how many passes does it take?
I'm following with interest, I know it's a work in progress but could you work in proper threaded screws for the heatsinkfixing to the mount as it sends a shiver down my spine recalling the guy that fitted a CD writer into his desktop PC using 1" long wood screws & wondered why we wouldn't warranty it.Also is there a risk to the build plate (Replicator 2) once the laser has cut through the material or do you swap it out?Manufacturing parts or assemblies isn't as cheap as doing something yourself, I produce a electronics unit in small quantities & I'm realistically making a loss on each one I produce due to the assembly time involved, if I had to pay someone then I'd have to charge a whole lot more.
Sorry if you don't mind me asking, but what makes up the cost of this other than the laser and power supply that can be found for about $90?( ebay.com/itm/638nm-300mw-Red-Module-12V-TTL-Laser-Moudle-Orange-Red-laser-beam-RL300-/121155969659?pt=US_Stage_Lighting_Parts_Accessories&;hash=item1c3575627b ) Isnt it possible to just hook the 12v output for the extruder right into this?
I had to set up a manufacturing line, hire a couple of people, etc. Making things in the US is expensive.Also, most of those modules are intended to be on briefly (a few minutes at a time), not all the time.Finally, note that the module you linked me is 0.3W and the L-Cheapo
is 2.1W -- this is why the L-Cheapo can actually cut plastic rather
than just engrave it; it's 7 times as powerful.
Awesome! thanks for being open about what is in your design, best of luck!
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