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Stanford Bunny

by phooky, published

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Stanford Bunny by phooky Aug 6, 2010

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Description

A cleaned-up Stanford Bunny, with the holes in the model sealed.

Recent Comments

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Look at what I've printed! --
&
gt; Porcelain Bunny

youtube.com/watch?v=VxqkjtG5da4
&
amp;feature=relmfu
I am assuming you have figured it out by now, but for anyone else reading this and wondering the same, that is called the raft. This helps to make your print more stable. Just cut off the base and you're good to go! :)
Hey, so I'm printing the bunny you've created on my new ToM to test it. I don't know why but it seems that my ToM first creates a square base around the design and then starts off with another base roughly a few cm larger than the bunny and only after that does it starts to the print the actual bunny.

So that means after the print I'll be left with a with bunny attached to a base, not like the bunny in the pictures. Could someone explain as to why my ToM does this?

Thanks :-D

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License

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If you print this Thing and display it in public proudly give attribution by printing and displaying this tag. Print Thing Tag

Instructions

This piece has a nice, rounded base, which makes it ideal for scaling up and printing even on machines without a heated build platform or chamber. The ears are just within the limits of overhang that a makerbot can handle, so depending on your temperature settings you may get some sagging on the lower edges of the ears.

Make sure to attribute this work to the original source: Stanford! Here's what they say about sharing:

Please be sure to acknowledge the source of the data and models you take from this repository. In each of the listings below, we have cited the source of the range data and reconstructed models. You are welcome to use the data and models for research purposes. You are also welcome to mirror or redistribute them for free. Finally, you may publish images made using these models, or the images on this web site, in a scholarly article or book - as long as credit is given to the Stanford Computer Graphics Laboratory. However, such models or images are not to be used for commercial purposes, nor should they appear in a product for sale (with the exception of scholarly journals or books), without our permission.

Look at what I've printed! --
&
gt; Porcelain Bunny

youtube.com/watch?v=VxqkjtG5da4
&
amp;feature=relmfu
Hey, so I'm printing the bunny you've created on my new ToM to test it. I don't know why but it seems that my ToM first creates a square base around the design and then starts off with another base roughly a few cm larger than the bunny and only after that does it starts to the print the actual bunny.

So that means after the print I'll be left with a with bunny attached to a base, not like the bunny in the pictures. Could someone explain as to why my ToM does this?

Thanks :-D
I am assuming you have figured it out by now, but for anyone else reading this and wondering the same, that is called the raft. This helps to make your print more stable. Just cut off the base and you're good to go! :)
I'm having serious printability issues. My printer is very nicely dialed in. Right about where the head is starting, it hits some stupid little line of plastic and skips by 10mm to the left. Incredibly annoying, seeing as I've probably wasted 3 bunnies worth of plastic.
How did you get this to print without skipping?
i was watching specifically when this happened to me.

For myself, the plastic hat it hit was the base of the ears.

on the maker-bot forum it talks about issues with trying to make a thing horizonal outcrop (ie: like the base of the ears). Sometimes this will cause the plastic to peel back and catch an edge. I saw this happen to me.

I never fixed it, though. Instead, i just added a top hat : )
Apparently something decided to pup up, and then the nozzle caught on it and made the platform jump up by a mm. It wasn't on an overhang...
correction: POP not pup
If your print is getting caught on itself, it's possible it's putting out a little too much plastic. Try increasing the "speed" parameter in skeinforge and see if that helps. You can also try increasing the power on your X stepper driver to help it get over any hang-ups. Oiling your bot and making sure the belt isn't over-tightened can help too.
Someone needs to invent a Chocostruder for this one!
Frostruder. Look it up :-D
I had good results printing this with quite low temperatures - 195C. At that temperature, the plastic is stiff enough that it doesn't drop too much. Also kept the ears from turning blobby. Adhesion of layers is still really good.
currently printing with support turned on... hope to have pics soon 8-)
Was that printed on a makerbot? Impressive! Any tips on tuning for overhangs? So far the things I've played with have been:
-thread sequence choice (perimeter/infill/loops etc)
-extra shells (not really successful)
-perimeter width over thickness (if skeinforge thinks the extrusion is wider than it is, it may go too far out)
-starting to play with temperature
(And yes, it was printed on a Cupcake.)
any chance we could sneak a peek at your skeinforge settings?
Skeinforge manages to luck out on the ears-- it produces narrow loops which project from equally-wide layer beneath them. I'm working on some skeining ideas that will produce structures like this for all overhangs (but it's on the back burner until I get a bunch of other code done).
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