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Timesquare Watch Body: Circling the Square

by adafruit, published

Timesquare Watch Body: Circling the Square by adafruit Jan 6, 2013

Description

The Adafruit community has been enjoying the new TIMESQUARE DIY Watch kits (https://www.adafruit.com/products/1106) so much that we wanted to offer another fun activity for our community to enjoy!

Adafruit's Matt Griffin took a stab at making a watch enclosure that transforms the right angles of the original kit into quite a different friendly, organic shape. And what's more this can be attached to the strap of a backpack or worn as a necklace fob or pocket watch.

This example design project also includes all of the files and references you need to create your own derivative TIMESQUARE enclosure. Read more about the TIMESQUARE DIY Watch Kit - Red Display Matrix here: adafruit.com/products/1106

Recent Comments

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Hello Eried! I used the Rhino for Mac public beta given that I am giving the design away to the community for free.

I'm going to make an effort to export the shape of the curve I swept around the rails so that I can challenge a friend to recreate this in OpenSCAD while I recreate it in Blender -- both tools are up to the challenge, though I find you have to be more careful about boolean operations.

When I complete my Adafruit Learning System project I will share resources there and here to help the community not only re-execute this watch quickly in other design tools, but to help people create their own designs!
What you used to design the case? looks great

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Instructions

ASSEMBLING YOUR WATCH
1. Assemble your TIMESQUARE watch kit, taking care to solder your components fairly close to the PCB.
2. Download and print out TIMESQUARE CirclingTheSquare.stl (or TIMESQUARE CirclingTheSquare_StrapFob.stl for pocket watch/fob) using your favorite 3D printer. We tend to slice it at .25 or .20mm layer height, with 1 extra shell. More news as we print more of these in-house and share what we learn!
3. Print a pair of the TIMESQUARE_RoundButton_Small.stl buttons and TSbar.stl strap bars.
4. Print out one each of the TIMESQUARE CircleTheSquareBackplate_Slits.stl and TSbuckle.
5. Clear away the support material from main enclosure ("frontplate") and the back of the buckle.
6. Slide the Small Buttons into the two rounded openings on the side of the watch enclosure, pushing from the inside out so that the rectangular end faces the interior of the watch enclosure. You might want to tape them in place (from the outside) to make sure they don't slide into the enclosure during the next step.
7. Insert your button battery and then place your electronics into your case. Press it firmly, carefully up into the faceplate.
8. Test your buttons -- the feet of both Small Buttons should press the buttons attached to the PCB.

ATTACHING A STRAP OR FOB
Locate a ribbon or thin strap that is approx. 20mm across (3/4" will do nicely!) and thread a loop through one of the large strap bays at the top or bottom of the watch and then pull the loop tight with the TSbar inserted to lock the strap in place.

Note that you can insert the TSbar on the inside for a pocket watch or fob attachment (please insert TSbar and fob strap before electronics for easier handling) or on the outside to loop the strap down across the backplate to pin the electronics when configured as a watch for wrist or backpack straps.

There are a number of configurations possible, but the best for small arms is to use the backplate to thread the strap out through the middle slots. Larger arms, legs, and other objects might benefit from the outer slots. In any configuration you can use a combination of the TSbar pieces and the backplate to thread the strap across to lock the backplate against the electronics.
Hello Eried! I used the Rhino for Mac public beta given that I am giving the design away to the community for free.

I'm going to make an effort to export the shape of the curve I swept around the rails so that I can challenge a friend to recreate this in OpenSCAD while I recreate it in Blender -- both tools are up to the challenge, though I find you have to be more careful about boolean operations.

When I complete my Adafruit Learning System project I will share resources there and here to help the community not only re-execute this watch quickly in other design tools, but to help people create their own designs!
What you used to design the case? looks great
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