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Parametric Modular Rolling Cookie Cutter

by kkronyak, published

Parametric Modular Rolling Cookie Cutter by kkronyak Dec 25, 2012

Description

This design is for a parametric modular rolling cookie cutter device. With this, and a little preparation work, you can make a rolling cookie cutter out of just about any 2d sketch! The size of the cookie cutter, drum diameter and number of cutters are all configurable, among other things. All you need to do is make a DXF file from your drawing, use a profile SCAD file to tweak the position, size etc. and render.

This design is completely original. All examples except for the Circles and Squares which use OpenSCAD primitive shapes were hand drawn and scanned by my artist friend Valerie! Unfortunately I have not been able to create a physical copy of this yet as my 3d printer hasn't arrived yet but I hope to be able to do so soon.

This design can also be used as an example of wrapping a flat object around a cylinder. See the hSlice module for how that works.

This is my entry into the ProtoParadigm Winter Wonderland Contest. Check out their site at protoparadigm.com -- I ordered my initial filament from their and their customer service is great!

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Instructions

The STL files are ready to slice and print -- just pick the one you want! You should print at least one set of handles which will allow for a better grip and prevent the central shaft from moving out of the drum. If you wish to permanently affix the handles to the shaft, it may be beneficial to fit a PTFE washer between the handle and drum to prevent friction and abrasive wear on the parts.

For those who want to make their own original cookie cutter designs, you can do the following:


Create a solid shape of the object. This can be done on the PC or by scanning a hand-drawn image and filling in the blanks.
Import your bitmap into Inkscape and use the Trace Bitmap function to convert the bitmap into a vector graphic. I found using the edge detection setting worked nicely, followed by the simplify path command to cut down on artifacts.
Fill in the outline shape with solid black
Export the shape to DXF. I used the "Better Better DXF" export plug-in -- the built-in Inkscape DXF export did not want to play nice with OpenSCAD
Create a profile for your DXF in OpenSCAD. Use one of the existing profiles as a template -- you will need to adjust the scale and offset for your image. I used a 50mm circle as a reference to get all of the shapes to be a consistent size, but it shouldn't really matter as long as you configure the other parameters appropriately. You can temporarily modify the profile OpenSCAD script to run the baseShape module to get a preview of what it will look like
Render to CGAL
Export to STL
Optimize*
Slice
Print!**

I have included the sample PNG, SVG, and DXF files for the included examples. Please use these as a reference if you wish to create your own shapes!

The cutter may not be perfect, and I've found my wrapping procedure works best if you keep the overall shape in a roughly 1:1 aspect ratio.


* I used Netfabb Basic to optimize my files. I used Slic3r to test and make sure they appeared to slice correctly and the Netfabb repair commands (I think particularlly the "remove degenerate faces" command) drastically cut the slice time. It also corrected some issues with parts of the cutter not being sliced correctly. The tool is free on netfabb.com and I recommend downloading it!

** Printing with support is almost certainly required for most consumer-level 3d printers. You will need to trim away the support before use.

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