Loading
Hey! This thing is still a Work in Progress. Files, instructions, and other stuff might change!

Electroacoustic mini-sitar

by alan_one, published

Electroacoustic mini-sitar by alan_one Jan 2, 2013

Description

Experimental stringed instrument.

Recent Comments

view all
Thanks that'll be very useful for the next design! for this one I simply made measurements on my electric guitar
Thanks, that'll come in handy - I couldn't find a calculator for this, I just made measurements from my electric guitar.
Fretboard calculator...

tundraman.com/Guitars/FretCalc/index.php

It does not cover other equal temperaments, only 12 per octave (western stander). Does different scale lengths and more/less frets.

More from Music

view more

Liked By

view all

Give a Shout Out

If you print this Thing and display it in public proudly give attribution by printing and displaying this tag. Print Thing Tag

Instructions

You want to print this with at least 4 shells or it will warp like the dickens when you put tension on the strings.

Standard guitar tuning pegs are mounted on the head, and the head is epoxied to the body (see photo). Use the peg shims if your pegs are too short to hold the strings against the nut. You may also need to use a triangular file to make the string guides in the nut a bit deeper. Three strings from a regular guitar are used. There is room to mount a 1/4" jack for a piezo pickup.

An attempt was made to design a sitar-style bridge on this instrument. It doesn't really achieve the desired effect although sanding down the bridge to a smooth finish may help. This is playable but I will probably design a better one with separate neck and hollow body as well as a longer scale.

Fretboard calculator...

tundraman.com/Guitars/FretCalc/index.php

It does not cover other equal temperaments, only 12 per octave (western stander). Does different scale lengths and more/less frets.
Thanks that'll be very useful for the next design! for this one I simply made measurements on my electric guitar
Thanks, that'll come in handy - I couldn't find a calculator for this, I just made measurements from my electric guitar.
Top