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Bre Pettis

Alexander The Great

by bre, published

Bre Pettis
Alexander The Great by bre Dec 31, 2012

Description

This is one of my favorites at the Brooklyn Museum. It's a small piece, about 4" tall. I used 123D Catch to acquire the scan and Netfabb to fix the holes and make the bottom flat.

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Great model :)
Didn't he say it was only 4" tall?
I'd go with netfabb which can split things.

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Instructions

I made one that has a flat bottom for 3D printing or you can use the full scan and support material
I see those gears in your head turning.
It would be awesome to print this the same size as the original...
Are there any guides online on how to accomplish this? I've got a few models I'd love to "Super Sizeâ„¢" on my Thing-O-Matic but I don't have much experience chopping up STL files into multiple parts.
I'd go with netfabb which can split things.
Well, a reprap wallace is easy to scale with openscad, build, cheap to boot, hack and replicate in contrast to whatever proprietary, sterile, overpriced makerbot.
Danieltroll, what is the world is this comment even about? You realize this is for talking about a 3d model of Alexander the Great? Not for propaganda about whatever you feel like. Troll somewhere else.
I don't think that statue would ever fit in whatever commercial printer, for a "sane" amount of money. So, besides *chop* *chop*, one have to simply build one for the purpose.
Didn't he say it was only 4" tall?
Hey DanielPublic,

I think to be fair, you have to understand that MakerBot and RepRap are different and have been since the beginning. Back when I made RepRaps it wasn't nearly as easy. The focus was on creating a 3D printer as cheaply as possible, with as minimal "vitamin" part count as possible. MakerBot's basic mission is to get this technology into the hands of creative people and onto the desktops of the world. Anybody who has made more than 100 RepRaps knows that RepRaps are not optimized for mass manufacturing. When we switched over to lasercut parts, we knew that we were going against the RepRap grain in order to accomplish our goals of significant distribution. You'll notice that RepRaps that have gone into production and taken a consumer focus have shifted to using less vitamins and more lasercut and 80/20. RepRaps are cheaper, because that is one of the goals, but only if you don't factor in the value of your time. For many, any time making something is priceless, so this doesn't apply to them!

One of the other reasons we started MakerBot is because there were so many RepRap projects and there wasn't much continuity. Back when I was working on RepRap, there were literally no two RepRaps that were the same. Having a standard platform let MakerBot Operators make upgrades that all the other MakerBots could use. Having a standard platform also made it possible to offer support. We've come a long way since the cupcake to build something that I feel sets a standard in the prosumer market of 3D printing.

I'm always surprised by people who are RepRap lovers and MakerBot haters because I'm proud of all the RepRaps that MakerBots around the world have created and I encourage folks who have any kind of 3D printer to try their hand at building a RepRap. Don't expect it to be easy or fast, but you'll learn a lot and you stand a better chance these days of ending up with a working RepRap than I did years ago thanks to the awesome power of the growing RepRap community.

Bre
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