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Bee-Bot

by DaveHardcastle, published

Bee-Bot by DaveHardcastle Mar 17, 2013

Description

The Bee-Bot is a small robotic bee designed to help our endangered native bees - and to help with future pollination of crops.

Recent Comments

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You might be able to print without supports, but the tips of the arms will be hard to get to stick to the build platform unless they're a little "flat" where they touch it. Also, it would help a lot if the arms are at 45 degrees, or steeper.
I think that you are right. I've done a lot of 3D printing, and you have to make sure that everything being printed is supported while it's being printed.

Also, if the arms are supposed to move freely, the easiest way to do that is to print them separately and assemble them after printing.

Cool Bee-Bot!
I have not done any 3d printing, but I've seen a 3d printer in up close and action and the big thing to be on the look out for is printing overhangs or printing in mid air. With my limited understanding, i would say that the arms might need to be printed separately and possibly in 2 halves

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Instructions

I have designed the Bee-Bot to have ball jointed arms that will move/swivel - but not sure if the tolerances are correct until I can test it with a 3D Print in the near future (I hope). The original model and renderings were produced using Lightwave 3D, with the stl file being produced using MeshLab. I have designed the base to be completely flat to help printing.

I have not done any 3d printing, but I've seen a 3d printer in up close and action and the big thing to be on the look out for is printing overhangs or printing in mid air. With my limited understanding, i would say that the arms might need to be printed separately and possibly in 2 halves
I think that you are right. I've done a lot of 3D printing, and you have to make sure that everything being printed is supported while it's being printed.

Also, if the arms are supposed to move freely, the easiest way to do that is to print them separately and assemble them after printing.

Cool Bee-Bot!
You might be able to print without supports, but the tips of the arms will be hard to get to stick to the build platform unless they're a little "flat" where they touch it. Also, it would help a lot if the arms are at 45 degrees, or steeper.
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