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3D-printable sand play set

by CreativeTools, published

3D-printable sand play set by CreativeTools Jul 3, 2015

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Summary

This is the perfect set of 3D models for a day at the beach or at the park with the kids.

3D-print the set as is, or scale the items to fit your 3D printer’s build plate.

Contains five easy-to-print 3D objects: a sifter, a shovel, a rake, a bucket and a mold for making sandcastle towers.


By Creative Tools

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What size is this originally
My printer only has size
Of 140 X 140 X 135

6 days ago - Modified 6 days ago
CreativeTools - in reply to humzasiddiq

You can download and open the files in the free software http://netfabb.com/downloadcenter.php?basic=1 to measure the original scale. You can also resize them and cut them into smaller pieces.

This is nice and all, yet not original nor useful... there are way worse things than this on thingiverse and my comment is not intended to criticize the author, I just don't understand why this is fatured. It is the contrary of what 3d printing is useful for... this is a common design of an object which is readily available elsewhere, in a cheaper yet way stronger form than a 3D printed version would ever be.
Unless you emboss the baby's name on the pieces before printing, which would make it unique, hence maybe worth printing, but still won't last past the first day at the beach... my fat two cents :-)

I completely disagree. Printing something like this in PLA is absolutely amazing. How many of these cheap toys pile up in landfills every year? Honestly, you buy this at wally's and a kid uses it probably one time and it breaks anyway. Or the ocean takes it away. Great more plastic floating around in the Pacific...

I say print it and don't feel bad about tossing it when it breaks. Or just recycle.

You probably have a misconception about PLA's eco-friendliness: it's not really compostable unless you put it at very warm temperatures, otherwise it's just "another plastic", albeit less "toxic". Still, you require much more energy for the hours of printing needed for this, instead of the few seconds needed for injection molding, and the final product is, in fact, way more brittle than any commercial one. Also, the price tag on this "eco-plastic of ours" is too dam high! (TM)
So, other than the inspiring reply given by the author, your objection is "weak" :)

Apr 21, 2016 - Modified Apr 21, 2016
wobski - in reply to ephestione

Again coming with a narrow perspective. What about the energy costs to get said injection molded plastic from China to your local crap dispensary? There are many angles to consider which you are not.

Why put quotations around "weak"? Are you quoting someone?

I am sorry to disagree with you, but I think that this objection of yours is "weak" too, and not because I'm quoting someone, just because weak in itself might be too strong an adjective (pun not intended) and I wouldn't mean to sound in any way aggressive to you nor like to start your typical online argument :)
I might as well be buying filament which is made in China anyway, and since this kind of plastic needs to be processed from pellets into filament, and only after by our printers, it also requires more processing than just using pellets to directly feed them directly into a molding machine.

Thanks ephestione for your comment. The primary reason for us to make this playset is because we at Creative Tools simply love 3D printing so much that we can't stop ourselves from making fun stuff and printing whatever comes into our minds. :)

We totally agree with you that this 3D-printable sand play set is not so unique and in some ways does not add any value to 3D printing comparing it to buying an injection-moulded alternative in from a store.

Nevertheless you yourself also made the point that we want to borrow and clarify in the following example:

  • Suppose I want to give a sand play set to my nice Alice Smith, who loves snowflakes
  • I will probably be able to spend an eternity traveling from store to store, trying to find playsets with her name on but no store will be able to provide me with this item because it simply does not exist.

  • If I instead ask a manufacturer of such playsets if they can supply me a name-engraved version and also ask if they can put a snowflake on it - they will probably say yes, but also ask me how many thousands of toys I want to order.

  • If I am am new to 3D printing and don't know how to 3D model, I really won't be able to give Alice this unique playset

  • Alternatively I could download this playset from Creative Tools, open the items in a easy-to-use 3D software such as TinkerCAD and without much effort put her name and a snowflake on them, and then 3D print her gift.

  • Better still. Instead of buying a dirt-cheap nameless playset from the nearest gas station and just hand it over to her, I can show her how to be less of a passive consumer of mass-produced items. Instead i can show her TinkerCAD and teach her how she herself can create and adapt the products she uses and make them unique.

  • Finally I would show her how to use a 3D printer and let her experience creative manufacturing. This would probably take much more time than ripping open the gift wrapping paper from the gas station, but would also be infinitely more fun for her.

Thank you for your reply, you completely sold your opinion to me and I have absolutely nothing to add :)
I've loved 3d printing in the week I've been the owner of a prusa i3 model, yet even if I wouldn't print something just because "it's fun" (and it is, but I had my very own venture project in mind when I bought this expensive toy) your interpretation rings very well!

We are glad to hear that we have similar experiences about 3D printing. Anyone who has age enough to remember the popularisation of the Internet in the 90s, can see similarities with 3D printing now. There is something really nice and empowering about it.

Cheers! :)

Cool, if you want a small scale model but I do not recommend printing it with PLA if you want to use it. I hade some objects that melted away in the sun.

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while i think this looks really fun, i think it's not worth the trouble printing it knowing i can get the same set for 6$ in the store

I agree.

It's not because you can print it, that you have to... Unless you're living on an island without a store in it.

Sei un grande! Complimenti....

Very cool!
This is a great present for my nephew's first birthday!
:-)
Thank's a lot!

Let's Go Play with the Kids!

Thanks MustangDave :)

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