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Emergency Button Replacement - Super-Fast Print

by Bioluminescence, published

Emergency Button Replacement - Super-Fast Print by Bioluminescence Jun 27, 2011

Description

DISASTER SCENARIO No.2

You pick up your pair of trousers/pants and "Oh no!" the top button of the button fly has broken! You've already salvaged any other buttons you could from unneeded pockets, etc - you really don't have a button to use!

Worry not - you can very quickly print a replacement, sew it on, and be out of the door in under 15 minutes! (Depending on your hand-sewing speed.)

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Emergency button for replacing broken or lost buttons on clothing.
2cm diameter - appropriate for button flies.
Very quick to print - under 5 minutes.
Doesn't bend, flex or snap - tested as the top button on a pair of pants for 2 weeks of wearing and counting.
Safe* in the washing machine and tumble dryer.

*So far - YMMV, but the average tumble dryer heats to 175C, and while PLA softens at 50C, the extrusion temp is closer to 230C.

Recent Comments

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Hello! I recently contacted you using Thingiverse's private messaging system, but I don't know if that message actually reached you, or not. I work for MAKE magazine, and I am hoping to include some of these images and a quote from you, about this Thing, in a forthcoming special issue about 3D printing technology. Please contact me, at your earliest convenience, by e-mail at sean@makezine.com. Thanks! Hope to hear from you!

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Instructions

Print with or without a raft - the raft version will take longer to trim than it will to print the button, but printing raftless can result in slightly 'closed' button-eyes.

Print normally.

I recommend a quick 30 second going over with a piece of sandpaper on the edge (if you print raftless) to get rid of the slightly sharp edge where the plastic touched the print base.

If you are nervous about putting these through your washing/drying cycle, pop one or two in an old tied off sock, or small fabric bag, and throw them in the next cycle. The bag/sock will stop the plastic from melting everywhere, if it does fail for some reason. I've had no issues, personally.


(I consider this the second in the "Morning-Emergency Clothing Disaster" range of 3d prints - the other being the emergency cufflinks. thingiverse.com/thing:7083 )

Comments

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seanmichaelragan on Sep 13, 2012 said:

Hello! I recently contacted you using Thingiverse's private messaging system, but I don't know if that message actually reached you, or not. I work for MAKE magazine, and I am hoping to include some of these images and a quote from you, about this Thing, in a forthcoming special issue about 3D printing technology. Please contact me, at your earliest convenience, by e-mail at [email protected] Thanks! Hope to hear from you!

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