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Flat Pack Fastenerless (FPF) Game Table With Reversible Top

by seanmichaelragan, published

Flat Pack Fastenerless (FPF) Game Table With Reversible Top by seanmichaelragan Nov 19, 2008

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Adam and I
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Bre Pettis

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Summary

This 24" high game table is intended to be cut from a 2x4' panel of 3/4" stock material such as plywood or MDF. The legs slot together and the top is secured between tabs at their upper corners. The reversible top might be painted with, say a chessboard on one side and a backgammon board on the other.

Instructions

This .dxf file contains ideal part profiles, which is to say that these ARE NOT tool paths, because they do not account for the kerf of your cutting tool. I assume you have the capacity to make appropriate corrections for your mill. Certain profiles, such as the bottoms of the legs and the edge of the table top, are shared between multiple parts to minimize materials wastage and other factors. It is impossible to correct these profiles for kerf, but error here will affect only the tightness of fit of the table-top. The distances between the tabs that restrain the top could be reduced to compensate for any "rattle" that might result from a wide kerf.

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Gonna make the chairs as well? I liked them :)
http://www.iamanangelchaser.com/products/puzzle_chair/puzzle_chair.htmlhttp://www.iamanangelchaser.co...

(Sadly I spend too much time away from the laser or even my RepRap which is one room away)

I don't actually have a CNC mill yet, unfortunately. And I'm not reallysure of the utility of posting ideal part profiles. It feels like I should be posting tool paths. I guess it gives people ideas, even if they can't just download it straight to the mill and run it. But since I don't have a mill I don't know what kerf to assume. 1/4" maybe? Is that pretty standard? It occurred to me after I posted this that you could correct for kerf errors on the inner legs/tabletop perimeter cut by taking ALL the kerf out of the legs and none of it out of the round table top piece. It doesn't matter if the legs are a bit thinner, of course, but the table top really ought to be nominal diameter.

Thank you both very much.

Yes, very efficient but still beautiful. I guess the best word for both is elegant!

That is SWEET! Lovely work, Verry nice use of space!

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