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Tinker-Friendly LACK Enclosure

by zuspiel, published

Tinker-Friendly LACK Enclosure by zuspiel Jan 3, 2017

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Summary

Edit: Added comments from IWannaMakeStuff
Edit: Added additional pics of wiring and more info on hinges
Edit: Added link to new RPi fan
Edit: Added link to new RPi buck converter
Edit: Added link to drill jig for leg extensions
Edit: Added link to Jure's filter stack
Edit: Added taller upper leg for a total height of 95.3mm
Edit: Added taller upper leg for a total height of 100.3mm

Design Philosophy

Let's face it: If you bought a 3D printer, you like to tinker. You can't help yourself and are constantly making improvements (and "improvements") to all kinds of things. That means an enclosure for the printer will be upgraded constantly. Therefore, I wanted a design that enables that. Primary design goals were

  • Sleek exterior. Basically a smooth cube all the way around.
  • Clean looking interior
  • Simple, fast, and full access to the printer within.
  • Easy to "mod" down the road
  • Spend money sensibly

Design Ideas

  • Entire top needs to be removable
  • Mount all electronics (basically) out of sight on the inside top
  • Inset, flush walls and door
  • Reconfigurable wiring
  • External 12V power supply to avoid dealing with mains voltages

So I started with two Ikea Lack tables ($16 total) like many others and went from there. I tried to keep the rest of the costs down but didn't want to cut corners in terms of features or looks.

Leg Extensions

The Lack tables are not tall enough to fit a printer comfortably, so extensions are necessary. I wanted the ultimate in servicability, so what better way than making the entire top come off? Easiest way was to design two piece leg extensions. The cone design makes it trivial to assemble and it's plenty sturdy. I stood on one of them which did not hurt it. Was contemplating some sort of locking mechanism to lock the top down but it's not really necessary. The extensions use hidden screws and the corners are even rounded to match the radius of the Lack legs.

The whole top can be lifted off after disconnecting the USB cable to the Rambo and unplugging the 12V supply to the top of the enclosure. Takes less than 10 seconds and you have full access to both the printer and all the enclosure bits. For further access, one or more of the side panels can then also be unscrewed.

The F360 archive contains the complete parametric design. Select "Change Parameters" and you can adjust the design at will. See screenshot. Turning the "Analysis" section on and off toggles the cut planes, FYI.
The STLs are sized for a 50.3mm extension. It's that value because I thought it would make it square. Except I didn't account for the fact that the legs are slightly inset... ;-)

For much easier mounting of the extensions, print out this great jig by lukefeil.

Side and Rear Walls

While transparent walls look cool, they have a couple of disadvantages

  • Heat insulation
  • Price
  • Ease of working with them

I went cheap(ish) and easy using 6mm thick "foamed" PVC

Easy to work with. Can cut nicely with a jigsaw using a PVC blade. Trivial to screw into. Fairly sturdy, one could easily mount (lightish) things to them if one wanted.

They are held in place from the inside with four printed brackets each (F360 "Small Parts", "Panel Bracket.stl"). The brackets are thicker on one side to allow me to use the screws I had laying around. The screws are small sheet metal screws and have nice big heads. Plus they are black... I used them throughout.

It's useful to make a little jig before drilling the holes. Way easier than measuring.

I used cheap foam insulation tape to seal the walls, sticking the tape to the legs so the panes can be removed while leaving the tape in place.

Door:

Used 3mm acrylic ("Plexiglass") for this.

Hadn't worked much with acrylic in the past but had sufficient respect so I didn't botch it completely. Tried the "score and break" method first but I guess I wasn't patient (deep) enough with the scoring. Ended up doing rough cuts with the same PVC blade in a jigsaw and then sanded it down using a layered sandpaper wheel in an angle grinder. I used an aluminum angle as a guide during the sanding.

Went to a local hardware store to see what hinge designs were available. I had contemplated printing some but didn't want them on the outside. The mechanism for inside hinges is a bit involved, so buying them seemed like a better option. I found a style that worked well with two exceptions: Looks and very strong springs. The looks were easy to hide behind little printed cover plates (F360 "Small Parts" archive, "Hinge Cover.stl"). The spring and its casing can actually be completely removed. Since it's nice to have the open door hold open by itself, I instead decided to replace the spring with a much weaker one I had laying around. Pardon the C-clips on the back of the hinges. I didn't have any regular black screws ;-) Incidentally, those screws are the only externally visible ones on the whole enclosure. Avoiding them seemed more trouble than it was worth.

Edit: I believe these are the hinges I picked up: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liberty-90-Degree-Surface-Mount-Hidden-Spring-Hinge-1-Pair-H01068C-UC-C5/100176398
The cylinder in the center of the hinge can be removed. The spring is hidden inside.

Edit:
Comment from IWannaMakeStuff:
A couple of hardware/parts notes: The Home Depot hinge you linked does indeed work as designed, but note it does not match the footprint of the hinge cover file you included without modification. To match I printed X at 44mm instead of 48mm. Y (48mm) and Z (0.8mm) remained as they were and were fine. However, make sure you measure the screw locations carefully as they don't line up where you might expect. Instead of sheet metal screws, I used M3 x 12mm screws and nuts, though I'll probably upgrade to lock nuts when I replenish my supply.
For the handle, I used this with two M4 x 16mm screws and lock nuts: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:36465

The door is held closed by a magnetic pusher from my parts bin. Used epoxy to glue a washer to the door for the magnet to grab.

Edit: Comment from IWannaMakeStuff:
I like your hinges but I prefer an alternative door handle, so I've created a magnetic bracket that can be used with different handle styles. You can view it at the link below. Please feel free to add it to your description if you find it useful. :-)
http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2186895

To seal the sides and top of the door, I used this automotive rubber casket. One could use it all over the place but it's significantly more expensive than the foam tape. Looks the part and works well.

Filament Guide in Top Surface

I used a scaled down version of a Thing I found, but I appear to have lost the original link. Sorry...

Front Control Panel

This is behind the door since it looks cleaner and the buttons don't really need to be accessible with the door closed. Files are called "Thermometer_Power_Switch_Box".

Power button - Turns on lights and fume control fan (the Pi is constant on).

Fan override button - Turns on all exhaust fans, indicates when exhaust fans are on (either automatically via the controller or through the override button)

Both button are hooked up via these pre-wired plugs. I could have soldered the wires on, too...

Temperature Display - Cheap and nice looking. Not much to say. The sensor is right behind the control panel.

Fume control

The initial reason for building this enclosure was temp control for ABS. I wanted to handle the ABS fumes internally to keep the enclosure location flexible. I found this Thing

Edit: Jure has meanwhile designed a better looking filter sandwich: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2105113

Does most of what I needed and could be tucked away in the back of the enclosure. I then went a step further and wanted a bit of convection in the enclosure. So I added the redirector (OSCAD, "CleanAirRedirector"). The HEPA filter restricts the flow considerably, so only a gentle breeze is coming out of it. We'll see how well it goes. The redirector obviously needs internal support when printing. It only redirects 2/3 of the clean output, increasing the chances that the exhaust fans pick up clean air.

Link to fan

It's a bit loud for my taste, so I may change it down the road. The fan currently runs whenever the lights are on, but I'll automate turning it on only while printing via the Pi in the future.

The whole thing is held to the top via four small brackets, sized to make it level (OSCAD, "FumeBrackets").

Exhaust

I'm using 3 small, quiet fans. Main reason I went for three fans is that I could be flexible in how many fans are controlled by the temp controller. In the grand scheme of things, that was probably more flexibility than needed but oh well. Bracket designed in OSCAD. Use short M3 screws to hold them in.

Temperature control is provided by this little temp controller.

A friend just found this alternative, which looks awesome. It's powered by mains voltage but should still be able to switch a 12V fan

The temperature sensor is positioned between the HEPA filter and the exhaust fans.

F360 "Small Parts - Temperature Controller Bracket", "TempControllerBracket.stl" and "TempSensorBracket.stl".

Air Intakes

I put two intake vents through the bottom table. The holes are located underneath the Z axis steppers (F360 "Small Parts", "Vent Cover.stl"). Being on the bottom, they can remain open all the time without loosing hot air.

Printer Padding

I had some 1/2 inch Dynaliner closed cell foam lying around. Makes a perfect cushion for the printer and sticks to the bottom.

Raspberry Pi

I used a Pi 3 since it has built-in wifi.

For the enclosure, this thing worked well.

And I used this fan.
Edit: Don't get this fan! Mine became very loud recently. I replaced it with this, using this adapter. The adapter isn't perfect, some of the walls are too thin to print, but it works. Will probably remix the top of the case to take the 40 mm fan directly.

And these heat sinks.

The fan is only running when the main power switch is on. No need to cool the Pi when nothing else is running.

The camera is the current PiCam.

and held in this case.

The case is not perfect (I used tape to hold it together...) but it's ok. I may design my own down the road.

To refocus the camera, this thing comes in handy.

The longer camera cable is this one.

Power comes from this.

However, there's a problem: I get undervoltage warnings on the Pi if a display is connected. I played with multiple USB adapters and see that issue with all the ones I tried. This may be an alternative, but I'm still not sure it'll be good enough.

Ideally, I want a 12V to 5.1V @ 2-3A solution that doesn't break the bank. Anybody have any ideas?

Edit: This buck converter is what I'm running now. The same board is also available at Amazon (thanks for the link in the comments).

Wiring

The entire gear runs from a single, external 12V power supply. That allows for safe wiring without having to worry about mains voltage running around. I didn't solder anything since that would just make it harder to change things down the road. Those wire clamps rule. They are used all over the place in Europe so I typically pick up a bunch whenever I'm back visiting. They can also be sourced in the US, though. The pics should be able to serve as a wiring diagram. ;-)

The zip tie anchors were great to keep everything neat. And they print without support.

Future improvements

Two focus areas: Safety and automation. I already have a 110V relay box and a smoke detector for the Pi

This will give the Pi control over the power to the printer, allowing it to shut things off if stuff starts smelling iffy. Octopi allows fairly simple integration of additional functionality, so I plan on adding an enclosure temp sensor and control of the fans via a relay board. There are many other things one could add...

Final thoughts

If I had to do it again, I'd probably use 20x20 extrusions. In the end, the Lack tables don't save that much money and most of the cost is elsewhere, anyway.

Print Settings

Printer:

Original Prusa i3 MK2

Rafts:

No

Supports:

No

Resolution:

0.15 or .2

Infill:

15%


Notes:

Printed with eSun PLA+. Only the clean air redirector needs supports.

I used a mix of Simplify3D and Prusa-edition Slic3r.

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what size did you end up cutting the acrylic and pvc to?

By far one of the best and most interesting enclosures I've seen! I'm in waiting for my Prusa Mk2S, my first printer. I can't wait to make this! Thank you for your detailed description and instructions! I sent you a tip! I don't even have a printer yet!! Great job!

Thank you so much for the tip! Completely made my day! Was my first tip ever.
Enjoy the printer. It's a great one.

Could you draw up a quick diagram of the wiring including the digital display on the front? I'm having trouble seeing what goes where in the pictures you posted because of the pi cam ribbon cable is in the way.

Thanks! and awesome job!

Sorry, my printer has hardly any down time these days and I'd have to have a closer look myself. Will have a look at the pic, though. Maybe I can describe it better.

What you need is a 12v to 5V synchronous buck converter. You can get one for less than $2 from the far East.

Yep, that's what I'm switching to if I ever get some down time.

how do you plan to actually power the rpi from the buck converter? cannibalize a micro-usb, or the GPIO?

Cannibalize a USB cable.

Congratz!!!!
Super design, great result.
This is giving me a base idea how to design my stuff.

FYI: the link to the 12V power supply at the bottom of your writeup actually redirects to some LED lights on Amazon.

Hi, great post and thank for sharing. I am still waiting for my printer to arrive, so plenty of time building my enclosure, apart from the 3d printed parts :)

I dont quite get the following
Air Intakes, this I get, just some passive holes in the lack table, but how are Fume control and Exhaust related?
Fume/hepa filter with fan I can see in the pictures, but where do you place the exhaust fans?

And another question, you use the exhaust fans to regultate the enclsore temperature, right? What temperature did you set the control unit at?

You got any recommendations for alternative 110V Power Relay? The one listed is out, and it looks like they'll stay out until they launch v2, but no idea when that'll be. This is something I'd like to learn more about, and thought this would be the perfect project to get hands on experience with it, but I'm really not sure what to look for now.

Appreciate any help. Cheers!

Had a quick look and couldn't find one either. This

https://www.amazon.com/POWERSWITCHTAIL-COM-PowerSwitch-Tail-II/dp/B00B888VHM

will do the same thing but is expensive... They are easy enough to build yourself, but lots of care must be taken and if you don't have much experience with mains wiring, I wouldn't recommend it.

Hey any chance of getting the .scad file for the upper leg. Thanks

The legs were designed in Fusion360. A F360 archive is one of the files. It's been set up fully parametric so you can change the height at will.

Ahhh, sorry i missed that. Thanks

I thought I asked this before in a comment but does anyone have more info on how plexi/pvc panels are attached to the legs? I see the leg bracket but can't see any detail on the process on how to attach them. Anyone have pics of this?

I used four of the little printed L brackets for each panel, screwed into the table legs.

Heya. Just wanted to let you know I resized your air redirector to fit JKSniper's filter sandwich. Finally getting around to printing it but a test print shows the holes line up just fine. I added it as a remix but heres the link also: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2298198

Clean Air Redirector - Jure Filter

Thank you, sir!

How do we get the f3d files into STLs? I don't have anything that can open them.

You open them in Autodesk Fusion360. It's free for tinkerers that make less than 100k with it per year... ;-)

Hi! Very nice work bro.
I tried to scale "upper_leg_v1" in a not uniform way on Z and results is not good, because it scales all the parts, including the conical part that becomes deformed .
Can you make a version of it where, from original "45.3 mm" it becomes "95.3 mm", i.e. 5 cm more tall?
Or, can you say me how can I make it?
Thanks!

Just uploaded it. Bottom is the same, new top is "Upper Leg V2 95.3mm Total Height.stl".

In general, to change it, load the F360 archive into Fusion360 and change the "totheight" parameter to whatever you'd like. Hit "ok", just export a new STL for the upper leg part.

I tried to edit .stl file of Upper Leg with Netfabb, Fusion 360 and tinkercad but no results for me.
With Netfabb I cutted model in a rectangle and I scaled it to obtain more 5 cm. Netfabb not licensed doesn't have MERGE option, so I saved two parts in 2 .stl files. Moving to Fusion 360, I don't know why, but final result is x10 scaled! It is strange because if I import one of this .stl in Cura, it is good.. instead when I import it in Fusion it is very big. So, I moved in tinkercad for join two pieces but it render in a bad way the piece with a conic part. I wanna cry.
Here you can see problem with Tinkercad:
https://ibb.co/icQWO5
So you are the last hope. Thanks!

Sorry, my bad. I didn't select the entire component before export (and didn't check the STL). Just uploaded a new one (same name) that's correct.

F360 for some reason doesn't get the size of imported STLs correct. There always seems to be a 10x enlargement. The best way to change the measurements is to download and import the F360 archive (Leg_Extensions_v8.f3d). Then you have full access to the parameters (see screenshot) and can change them. For some reason I didn't merge the two bodies of the upper leg, so you have to select the component for the STL export. In any case, the new STL should do the trick for you without messing with Fusion.

You are really kind .. in fact I feel a little bit guilty to tell you that the measurement is wrong xD. Cura tells me that the piece is 90.3 in total on height, but it would be 95.3.
Sorry and thank you :D

No problem. The total height of both upper and lower combined will the 95,3 mm. The lower piece has a 5mm thick bottom ;-)

Or do you need 5cm taller overall? I can do that, too.

Just uploaded V3 with a total height of 100.3 mm. Upper leg is 95.3 mm. Hope that helps.

Hi bro,
I realized that the piece so high is difficult to fasten with the screws at the table leg (it would take long screws at least 8 cm). My mistake. Can I ask you another favor? Can you add to the "upper leg 100.3 mm total length" two lateral supports for screws? I mean like this:

https://ibb.co/gH7F0k
https://ibb.co/hnDoLk

I'm referring to this:
3D printer case with Lack tables (Ikea) found on #Thingiverse https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2121640

3D printer case with Lack tables (Ikea)
by Shoyun

I only just checked the model, but the parameters seem to do their thing. No longer screws should be necessary. The larger-than-screw-head diameter holes go almost to the bottom. So short screws should be fine. Now just also checked the STL. No long screws needed.

Thanks bro, this is exactly what I need, a total height of 100.3 mm :D

May 2, 2017 - Modified May 2, 2017
danybr - in reply to zuspiel

Thank you for the very fast reply!
I think there was a problem while exporting the model, because the "Upper Leg V2 95.3mm Total Height" is less the conical part.
Could you reupload this design?
Here you can see the problem:
https://ibb.co/cmi4bQ
https://ibb.co/m8D4bQ
Thank you :D
P.S. I didn't find the .f3d file for the legs

I've built one using some of your parts. Awesome design. I'm having trouble though fitting the Prusa in front to back, with teh control panel on the front. If I adjust so the control panel is in, the wires from the heat bed hit the back of the enclosure. Stop the wires hitting, and the control panel doesn't it.

My front door and back panel are both 3mm, inset between the legs, but flush with the front and back.

How'd you get around this problem?

Actually, my bed cable does hit slightly in the back. It's fine in high power mode. I keep meaning to move the LCD... Another option is to remix the bed connector cover to make the cables come out angled towards the top. I played with the Thingy that has them come out towards the right, but wasn't convinced...

Thanks. Glad it wasn't just me. I moved the back panel to flush with the outside to give me a bit more room, and designed some new LCD mounts which were ~25mm shorter. All fits now just nicely.

Neat! Care to share the LCD mounts? I'd love to try them.

Sure can. You made me make my first thing :)

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2291409

Shortened LCD mounts for Prusa I3 Mk2

Awesome! Thanks. And that's what it's all about. :-)

Already collected and will print soon. My printer is already on some blocks, so that works perfectly.

Will also link it from the description when I get a minute.

I have what might be a dumb question but makes sense to me. Could you not just use this (http://amzn.to/2pbHtmD) and control your 12v fans do away with the switches and temp sensor? The one linked in the comments below seems to only be 120v and not and 12v outputs.

Very nice find! I didn't see this one. Yes, you most certainly could (and should ;-)

Anyone have a link to those 12v wire connector blocks on Amazon?

Sadly, I don't remember what they are called in English... Lüsterklemmen in German....

Thanks! Since it's all 12V, the less insulated terminal strips would probably be fine.

Hello,
It's really a good job. I want to get inspiration from this work. But I have a question, I see that all the electronics is inside the box. Did you have problems with overheating? What is the average temperature of the interior?

Thank you

Thanks!

Prusa runs their print farm at ~43C. When I print ABS, I'm running similar temps inside the enclosure. No overheating issues, yet.

Ok, thanks for the information, I will surely start the construction of the enclosure

Great info- what lights were used? I don't think its a huge deal either way but I like the amount of light the pics show.

The lights are these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LAAUCZ2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1. And it appears they are in stock again. Bit more expensive but I like the temperature, too. Will now order two more... ;-)

Going to print the upper leg stl and noticed that there were holes in the top of the mesh. Is this typical? I see through your snapshots that it's completely solid.

There should only be the 4 holes for the mounting screws. The STL is solid. Maybe some strange behavior of your slicer?

Hmmm Strange.. when I open it in tinkercad I have missing mesh but if I open in Cura or Fusion 360 both all complete. Any suggestions?

Is it the legs? If so, just use the F360 archive. Way less hassle and way better quality...
And F360 is really worth learning. I recommend the Fusion Friday videos my NYC CNC.

Yeah it's the legs upper to be exact. Yeah.. I spent this weekend learning tickercad. Oh well.. looks like it's time to learn something new. Thanks.. still kind of weird why it not present in tinkerCad.. Thanks again.

No problem. You're better off learning F360 in my opinion. Way more powerful. And the legs are fully parametric. You can just open the user params dialog (Icon looks like a capital sigma / sum sign) and adjust many things without having to draw anything.

Apr 8, 2017 - Modified Apr 8, 2017

I've been following this guide for about a week now printing out the necessary parts for my build. I picked up the Lack tables from Ikea and used different leg extensions (I don't need or want to remove the legs like this build). I've bought most of the electronics mentioned in this guide, and everything was looking great today until I hit a snag. As I'm using the other mentioned filter in the description, I noticed that the recirculator's holes doesn't fit the other filter system's holes.

Another issue I noticed is that the particle filter is set last, after the fan - I don't want to get any particles on the fan as that'll cause issues later down the line, this exhaust system needs to be reversed. So I'm going to redesign the system and place it under remixes if anyone's interested. It will use the same filters and fans so nothing will be changed there.

The only thing I have to say is that I am baffled by your wiring. While I do know how to re-wire lights, sockets, and other general things around the house, when it comes to electronics everything just goes over my head. I get a general idea of what's going on but there are some parts in the pictures where the wires are obscured or are not clear enough.

Between the power socket and the fan exhaust, is that a step-down converter? With the Pi 3 added it looks as though you've added a lot more wires to the build and this has thrown me off in some of the pictures. I need to purchase some wire and a few choc-blocks anyway so if I wire everything up - before I attach the power - is it possible you could check it out before I hit the switch?

Magnificent'y put together btw, I wouldn't have even bothered to make one without this guide. :)

Thanks.

It's all meant to be tinkered with, all remixes are very welcome (and kind of the point ;-).

Yes, there's a USB step down converter in that location. I still need to switch that out to a better buck converter.

Sure, I can check out the wiring, if needed. Trust your common sense, though, and you'll be fine.

Weird, your comment is "flagged for moderation" here and I can't see it. Sounds sensible, though. Definitely go with sufficiently sized wires.

Apr 13, 2017 - Modified Apr 13, 2017
Varsh - in reply to zuspiel

Yeah, I'm not sure why it is too - probably because I used an HREF to the amazon link. Oh well.

Anyway, I've got everything now except for the two switches. For the last couple of hours I've been stripping wires from old dead devices and so far I've managed to get fans to work after a set temperature and the Pi working. I'm going to make a slight adjustment to the wiring where the step-down converter is going to be set to the power button instead of always on, that way there's no power draw from the PSU. Another addition I might make is a switch from the PSU to the power connector, or I might have a 2 plug adapter with a switch under the bottom table and simply turn it on or off when the printer will be in use.

You're totally right though, wiring everything is actually really simple! A positive knowing that I haven't burnt the house down yet. =)

A note about my remix of the exhaust. I'm experimenting with a screw-less system. While there will be a couple screws to screw the thing into the table, everything else will be slid in place. This means that if you need to replace a filter then you can slide that portion out, replace it, then slide it back. I'm thinking of a way to do the same thing with it connecting to the current triple fan holder already on here. So far it's coming along nicely. Taken a while to get used to Fusion 360 though but now I think I've got the hang of it.

Glad to hear you got the wiring figured out.

Note about the step-down: If you use it to power the Pi, you'll have to properly shut down the Pi every time before you turn the power off...

F360 is worth the learning curve!

Well, I did remodel the enclosure and while at first, it is considerably (half the size) smaller than the original (same fan size and filter), the pins that I had to do a screwless design was just a weeeeeeee bit too thin so they snapped off. It does mean that I can change parts without having to remove the device, but I need to clamp it all together now so I won't release the remix as it's a bit of a failure - unless people want to see what I've done and improve it. ^^;

Either way, I've got all of the electronics working together now, the last thing remaining is the Raspberry Pi, the Pi Camera, and the panels. Then it's all done. :)

I have wired everything very differently to you (I think) so I will post a diagram of the entire circuitry for everyone to see soon. I just want to get everything running smoothly first.

Cool!

Apr 10, 2017 - Modified Apr 10, 2017
Varsh - in reply to zuspiel

I found a similar https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01M1KYBXP/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1, [url=https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B00GXXFBC0/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1]step-down converter[/url], and the [url=https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0195HFFGC/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1]pin adaptor[/url]. I was going to go for an all-in-one female DC5.5 x 2.1mm pin adaptor where it had a red and black in a sleeve, but the gauge seemed way too thin for the power supply in question, so I'll purchase some slightly higher gauge wire and then it's just a matter of piecing it all together. I can't wait but I have to for the power switches to arrive from Hong Kong. :(

At first: I love this Thing! It's clever, not too expensive and looks fantastic! Thank you very much, I will post my make in a couple of days.

I used the same three fans for exhaustion but it seems to get really hot in there, even with permanent exhaustion. I didn't tested it in detail, since I have just assambled the thing.

Did you heat your bed to 100°C for ABS?
What temperature did you set on the temp controller? 42°C like on the Prusa Farm?

Bed is at 100C for the first layer, 95C afterwards.

Temp controller is set to 42C. Max temp I've seen is 44C. But, yes, the fans are pretty much running all the time once it comes up to temp.

Okay, nevermind. It works fine. :D
The only issue: I think I need a stronger fan for the filter sandwich. I can barely feel any air flowing through. Maybe a little, but it's hard to tell.

You should use a fan built for static pressure. I purchased a Corsair SP120 for this build though I haven't tested the filter yet as I'm redesigning it. I'll let you know how I get on. Static Pressure fans are perfect for water cooling radiators so the same should apply here. A standard fan is no where near as competent.

Good to know. Please share how well it works. Thanks.

Now that's a useful tip. I will give the Corsair SP120 a try. Thank you.

With the smoke detector listed, I am trying to find out how to properly hook it to the Pi. Any diagram of how you did that and what coding you did to utilize it?

I still haven't hooked it up... ;-)

It's a fairly standard sensor, though. There are sensor libraries for the Pi out there.

Just printed out the feet / risers and figured I would share the actual results. The parts printed out great and took just a tiny but of sanding to get everything to fit together snuggly. The main reason I am writing this is to give an idea of realistic print times.

In Simplify3D with the following settings it said it would take 9 hours and 50 minutes to print:
Infill Percentage: 15%
Layer Height: 0.2mm
Speed: 100mm/s

With the same settings in Cura the projected print time was 10 hours 23 minutes.

The actual print time was 15 hours and 28 minutes. Slicers can't really take into account the actual print speed due to the speed controls in the firmware ( it probably really prints around 50mm/s due to the jerk settings / takeoff and slowdown speeds ).

Mar 28, 2017 - Modified Mar 28, 2017
devsfan1830 - in reply to blindmoe

Printed my feet all in one shot, 4 of each. Using a Prusa i3 MK2. Same settings but used its Slic3r PET preset (I used Black Inland PETG) which i THINK is 60mm/s for infill and 30mm/s for all else. Took about 24 hours (Octoprint initially estimated 3 days!). In my case parts printed perfect with no need to do any finishing other than pick off a few stringies.

Edit: actually my layer height was 0.15 so that probably contributed to a far longer print time.

for you fume control, did you exhaust out of the enclosure or stay in? I see you have some exiting but cant tell. this is awesome looking by the way!

As far as I understand, the filter portion redirects the output down and back into the box via a re-director plate to ahve it recirculate back into the filters to inprove the odds of catching fumes and particles. The exhaust fans sit up behind the re-director and thus in theory should only vent clean(ish) air when on. There is no direct connection between the filters and the exhaust holes.

Correct. I figured if I keep the air inside reasonably clean, it should be ok to vent.

And thanks!

Im currently building on of these. Im done with the structure and is now figuring out how I want the electronics/fans/filters.

Wouldnt it be a good idea to have double hepa-filters and move the coal-filter only to the exhaust-fans? Since the "dirty" air would need to pass through more than one hepa filter to get the smallest particles away, and the coal-filter only is for the smell.

Or is it to heavy for the small fans to push air through the coal-filter? I have no idea about the filters air-resistance.

The coal filters flow pretty well. For a double HEPA setup, you'd definitely need a significantly stronger fan. My sandwich only produces a gentle breeze (but I think that's enough).

Just noticed the suggestion for the better looking filter sandwich. Does the air redirector you designed still fit?

Sadly, no. The redirector was made specifically for the other filter sandwich. Shouldn't be too hard to design a fitting one, though.

I like your hinges but I prefer an alternative door handle, so I've created a magnetic bracket that can be used with different handle styles. You can view it at the link below. Please feel free to add it to your description if you find it useful. :-)

http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2186895

Magnetic bracket for doors and enclosures

Thanks, added.

A couple of hardware/parts notes:

The Home Depot hinge you linked does indeed work as designed, but note it does not match the footprint of the hinge cover file you included without modification. To match I printed X at 44mm instead of 48mm. Y (48mm) and Z (0.8mm) remained as they were and were fine. However, make sure you measure the screw locations carefully as they don't line up where you might expect. Instead of sheet metal screws, I used M3 x 12mm screws and nuts, though I'll probably upgrade to lock nuts when I replenish my supply.

For the handle, I used this with two M4 x 16mm screws and lock nuts: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:36465

Door Handle keep closed

Thanks, added.

Comments deleted.

The lack riser feet on your 7th pic look much shorter than the stls. Could you pretty please upload the stl for those? Tried editing the ones provided with tinkercad but the cone imports with missing faces and I am running linux so no fusion360 support :(

The feet in the pic are 1 mm higher than in the files, since I didn't get the "squareness" of the whole box correct. Combined, they provide a 50.5 mm extension of the legs.

If you'd like taller ones, just tell me the size and I can upload an additional STL.

Very nice build! I am in the process of making one also. I have the Lack tables stacked in front of me now, after having printed the feet / spacers to go between the two.

It looks like you have the RPi mounted to the underside of the top table? Can you take pics and show how the RPi is connected to the printer once the tables are stacked? Do you have a connector between the pi and the printer, to be able to install the two? If you have pics of that setup, could you possibly post them or send them to my email? Thanks!

Thanks! It's printing plus I'd have to take a wall panel off to take a pic from the side...
It's simple, though: See the coiled black cable behind the Pi? Part of that is the USB cable to the Rambo. A small portion of it hangs down right behind the frame and can easily be plugged into the RAMBo which is mounted on the back side of the frame with the USB port pointed up.

Thanks for the reply. Having the RPi connect via USB to the Rambo makes sense. I have a Folgertech 2020 i3, using a Ramps board and arduino, so I will have to look into a good setup for that. Thanks again!

I am confused how you vent your cabinet. Is there a vent hole in the top or back wall. Was going to vent mine out the window but sounds like if I use the charcoal filters I should be fine. Can you explain the ventilation to me. Sorry a little slow today.

Thanks!

Greg

Just wrote another reply and am also pasting it below. The three little fans in the back vent into the room.

I directly vent the exhaust from the 3 little fans to the room. The filter sandwich with the 12cm fan runs constantly when the enclosure is on. The idea being that the filter sandwich keeps the air inside the enclosure clean enough to directly exhaust. In addition, the three exhaust fans pull air from the area directly behind the HEPA filter, so it shouldn't have been mixed with "dirty" air from the print bed. 2/3 of the HEPA filter output gets redirected back to the bed, 1/3 "feeds" the exhaust fans.

Not perfect by any means but I don't want to mess with an exhaust hose and what comes out of the cabinet certainly smells clean... If you want to be 100% sure, you need an exhaust hose, though.

Feb 22, 2017 - Modified Feb 22, 2017
g6m6a6n - in reply to zuspiel

Again sorry very slow today. Can you take extensive pics and send them to me from the back? [email protected]

Will try to remember next time I remove the top. I don't like moving the enclosure/printer and the back is close to a wall.

This is really cool. I am currently building an enclosure for my MK2 (loving it!) and reuse a few parts from your idea. Thanks for sharing your work!!
I have a few questions:

  • How did you do the power cable management? Just added a hole in the back wall?
  • Do you use both filters described in http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:1831932? Are they filtering all fume and smell when printing ABS? Or do you attach a venting hose to your exhaust?

Thanks for your feedback and happy printing!

HEPA Filter holder for 120mm Fan (86889 Style Filters)
by mq1991

Thanks. And MK2 is a lovely printer.

RE power cable: Yes, I just notched out one of the rear corners to allow the power cable to exit.

RE filters: Yes, I'm using both. I (and more importantly, my wife) can't smell anything and ABS is all I print these days. The continuous filtering appears to do its job.

Also, see Jure's improved filter holder: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2105113

HEPA + Active Carbon Filter for 3D Printer Housing

Thanks for your quick response.

This filter sandwich looks very good! Definitelygonna use it!
Do you attach a ventinghose to your exhaust? Or just the filter with the 3 little fans? There is a discussion all over the internet if these filters are filtering all toxic particles from ABS or not, that's why I am thinking about if a venting hose is necessary or not.

I directly vent the exhaust from the 3 little fans to the room. The filter sandwich with the 12cm fan runs constantly when the enclosure is on. The idea being that the filter sandwich keeps the air inside the enclosure clean enough to directly exhaust. In addition, the three exhaust fans pull air from the area directly behind the HEPA filter, so it shouldn't have been mixed with "dirty" air from the print bed. 2/3 of the HEPA filter output gets redirected back to the bed, 1/3 "feeds" the exhaust fans.

Not perfect by any means but I don't want to mess with an exhaust hose and what comes out of the cabinet certainly smells clean... If you want to be 100% sure, you need an exhaust hose, though.

That's what I'm thinking, too!
I'll stick to the filter sandwich first and maybe add a venting hose if necessary.
The safest way would be to avoid printing with ABS which I will try, but sometimes you have to.

Thanks for your quick help! Placing my order for all the stuff an amazon right now :)

Cool! Enjoy the build and the result!

I print ABS almost exclusively since I like its properties.

Does it matter what printing material is used? Will PLA work or should I use ABS?

I printed everything with eSun PLA+. Regular PLA should also be fine but may be more brittle. By now, I print ABS almost exclusively since the enclosure makes it trouble-free.

I was going to make the parts in PLA to begin with and switch to ABS when finished.

Don't think there's a need to re-make them. My PLA pieces seem perfectly fine. Doesn't get hotter than 45C, so should be ok.

Jan 31, 2017 - Modified Jan 31, 2017

Great work!!

I am waiting other link to buy the same leds.

A question, what are the wires that need to expand the LCD?

I will put all electronic outside enclosure

Sorry, I didn't track that down since I didn't put mine outside. Some people reported problems with longer wires, others say they work. YMMV, I guess...

For the hinges you used. Do you have the brand name? May have found them myself but I'd like to be sure. I would also like your input on how much those hinges resist opening the door. I am concerned that the acrylic may flex when pulling the door open leading to cracking around the hinges.

I believe the hinges are these:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Liberty-90-Degree-Surface-Mount-Hidden-Spring-Hinge-1-Pair-H01068C-UC-C5/100176398

You're right. The original spring is way too strong for the acrylic. You can either completely remove the cylinder with the spring or put a much weaker spring inside. I did the latter and it works like a charm.

Hello, how your motor feel alive? I think they are might too hot against boxless.

The stepper motors are less of a concern than the electronics. With ABS, I run the enclosure at around 42C. That's similar to the temperature Prusa run their print farm at. If it works for them, I'm not too worried.

I will probably redesign the RAMBo case to allow for a 40mm Noctua fan to keep the drivers cooler, though.

Jan 30, 2017 - Modified Jan 30, 2017
priority - in reply to zuspiel

Electronics can not do anything in the box naturally. Drivers need to catch outside air, inside coolers cant cool any more with that temperature you know. I think about outside drivers (X and Y) in my next box (just box design, motors will stay on their old place, may be just X, Y motor I imagine in some perforating tube going through box, with coolers). Z motor you know not catch this heat.

Comments deleted.

Love the look of this case and might attempt something similar though the electronic wiring and everything might be outside my range of skill at the moment just getting into this stuff so it's a learning experience.

What kind of light strips was used I don't think I saw it in the list of build parts used. Also the tables I would assume it's just one size or do they provide different dimension for the tables?

Thanks! The wiring is not rocket science. You'll be alright.

The lights are these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LAAUCZ2/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1.
Problem is that they are no longer in stock. I really like the color temperature and construction. Am on the lookout for more of them...

The LACK table only comes in one size AFAIK (55cm).

Yeah I ended up finding the tables last night when I had a chance to sit down and do some searching they got 2 sizes one being slightly smaller but more expensive go figure. Sadly I am not sure if it would work with the printer I have the print area when the bed is fully extended towards the back and front on larger prints I think would run into the back and front walls measurements are pretty tight there. I got a Hictop 3dp-17 so I think I need to figure out a different set up.
I think I could figure out how to do the wiring I have the basics a few years ago but never did anything from there so would most likely take me some time to pick it up.

You ever thought of adding another enclosure where your filament is located to act as semi storage area to keep moisture out as well as hold extra spools?

can you take some more pictures of the enclosure and the wiring

Sure. Anything in particular that you're interested in?

I'll have to take the top off tonight to switch out the Pi cooling fan, anyway.

Just added a couple more pics of the wiring, including a diagram of how the exhaust fans are hooked up.

Comments deleted.

Hi, really nice project. I'm waiting my new printer, and probably I will make this enclosure :)

One question, what do you mean with the last paragraph "If I had to do it again, I'd probably use 20x20 extrusions. In the end, the Lack tables don't save that much money and most of the cost is elsewhere, anyway." ?

Thanks

Thanks!

The LACK tables are very nice for the price. One could spend an extra $70-80 to do the structure in aluminum extrusions, which would look cooler. Or maybe not... I'm somewhat torn, if you can't tell ;-)

hahaha ok :)

Awesome project and very nice description. Best Lack-table-enclosure-setup I have seen so far!!!

I am also thinking about Lack tables. Do they isolate the noise properly? I have doubts since they are built from extremely light material and using solid wood might silence the noise better. Did the more homogenous temperature in the build volume improve the quality of your prints? (I am currently dealing with annoying warping with PLA when printing bigger objects. Also on the Prusa MK2)

Thank you.

They isolate the noise somewhat, but not great. I use a foam pad under the printer, which helps.

I've only printed ABS since I finished it and have no warping. Did a 5cm high, 20 cm long, 1 cm wide beam as the first print. And the ends stuck down without any glue, magic, prayers, or anything else ;-)

Amazing project, really like it! Just got a second MK2 and will have a look into this myself. Thanks for sharing!

Wicked setup!

To power my Pi I used one of these (https://www.amazon.com/RioRand-LM2596-Converter-1-23V-30V-1Pcs-LM2596/dp/B008BHAOQO)
I have it wired into the printers power supply so the Pi turns on and off with the printer. The board can push 3A which is sufficient for the Pi, a webcam and to charge the tablet I use as the front end to Octoprint.

Yes, those work. Thanks for the link. A friend of mine pointed them out to me shortly after I was done. You can also get them on eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/10X-Re-DC-DC-3A-Buck-Converter-Adjustable-Step-Down-Power-Supply-Module-LM2596S-/222245520202?hash=item33bedd834a%3Ag%3AUZsAAOSwknJX05VB). My box of 10 just arrived today ;-)

The leg extensions were a brilliant idea. So that I can cut my glass correctly how much height was added with the leg extensions?

Sorry for the delay in answering. The extensions are 50.5mm but you can adjust it in Fusion360. It's a parameter.

Very nice what you have done.
Lots of people may benefit from it.
I will for sure, i am currently making an enclosure for my Zonestar p802QR2.
After looking to your work i will change some of the things i have done already.

Thanks!!

Thanks! I'm glad it's useful. Good luck with your enclosure. Make it better than mine!

Jan 3, 2017 - Modified Jan 3, 2017

Great work!
Ty for sharing.

Thanks!

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