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Anet A8 power supply cover with fan mount and power switch socket

by Tavero, published

Anet A8 power supply cover with fan mount and power switch socket by Tavero Jan 23, 2017
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Summary

Hi there,
I was looking for a power supply cover that satisfied all my needs but couldn't find one, so I made my own one.

This is a power supply cover for the new version of the Anet A8 and includes a fan mount for a regular 8cm fan and a socket for an IEC320 power switch. Like this one:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/1Pcs-15A-250V-IEC320-C14-3-Pin-Fused-Power-Socket-Connector-Rocker-Switch-/181749779642?hash=item2a51218cba:g:3fAAAOSwBLlVWt18

The "wall piece" on the left side protects your hotbed from airflow, so ABS and PETG prints don't cool down.

You will need three M3 screws for the cover and four M4 screws for the Fan.

optional:
There is one additional M3 screw hole on the left bottom for additional stability but you'll have to drill a hole into the Acrylic: I don't think this is necessary.

Print Settings

Printer:

Anet A8

Rafts:

Doesn't Matter

Supports:

Yes

Resolution:

0.2mm

Infill:

20%

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Hi there,
How did you wired the fan?

Hi there,
The wires are going through the big fan hole. I've made a tiny cut with pliers into the frame of the fan so it sits directly on the surface of the cover. Usually red to 12V+, black to ground. Blue is not needed

I also used one of these to reduce the fan speed
http://www.ebay.com/itm/best-Mini-3A-DC-DC-Converter-Adjustable-Step-down-Power-Module-replace-/322365636719?hash=item4b0e7d406f:g:LsMAAOSw5cNYWcmb

but you can use a regular resistor too

If you open up the PSU, or use your hand, you'll notice that there are two components (the power transistors) that get hot. They are mounted on the top, and the top right wall. Both of which are out of the line of airflow from your fan. If you wanted to make better use of your fan, you should mount the fan on the top half of the grill, not the bottom half.

It may be not the most optimal fan positioning, but a 80mm fan is producing so much airflow inside the PSU, that no part will ever get much hotter than room temperature. The wall on the side also redirects the airflow to the upper parts.

I actually reduced the fanspeed to around 70% because it was overkill

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