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Vise

by bboggess, published

Vise by bboggess Nov 14, 2017
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design spark mechanical tronxy

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Vise by bboggess is licensed under the Creative Commons - Attribution license.

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Summary

This was for a 3D printing class.
This device can be 100% printed (see links below) or you can buy some cheap all-thread and nuts at your local hardware store like I did.

This vise can be configured in a lot of different ways. It can turn 360 degrees around while being extended out a few inches. The extender can be removed and the vise can then be placed straight up or on its side directly on the base and then each of these configurations can be rotated 360 degrees. Two knobs are included to lock the vise at whatever angle it desired.

It can be locked at almost any angle (see pictures).

Details:

There is a large version and a small version of the vise. The large version is 200 mm wide for the largest dimension of any part.
The small version is half the size of the large version in every dimension.
The files are separated by name with "small_" appended to the filename on the small version.

Parts List:

1/4 - 20 all-thread (I bought a rod about 20 inches long for $1.60)
1/4 - 20 nuts (10 per vise)
(if you want to print everything you might try this --->
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:125838 (all-thread) https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2501430 (nuts) )

Printed Parts:

Small Vise:
  • small_Vise_base2 - base with cylinder
  • small_Vise_bolt_tube - captive nut tapped in from the side (2 used)
  • small_vise_clampArm3 - the moving side of the clamp
  • small_Vise_sleevePads - removable jaws (2 used)
  • small_Vise_Lextender2 - an optional piece that allows the vise to swivel
  • small_Vise_main7 - the main part of the vise that can be mounted different ways
  • small_Vise_wheel3 - the wheel that opens and closes the vise
  • small_Vise_Knob - the knob used to lock the vise in place (2 used)
  • small_Vise_wheel2_washer - washer used to lock wheel to all thread
Large Vise:
  • Vise_base2 - base with cylinder
  • Vise_bolt_tube - captive nut tapped in from the side (2 used)
  • vise_clampArm - the moving side of the clamp
  • Vise_clipPads - removable jaws (2 used)
  • Vise_Lextender2 - an optional piece that allows the vise to swivel
  • Vise_main6 - the main part of the vise that can be mounted different ways
  • Vise_wheel3 - the wheel that opens and closes the vise
  • Vise_Knob - the knob used to lock the vise in place (2 used)
  • Vise_wheel2_washer - washer used to lock wheel to all thread

Improvements:

I increased the nose length of the clamps on the small vise from the pictures and made the vise open wider by making the Clamp Arm longer. As part of this change on the small vise, I made new clamp sleeves that fit this larger size (removable jaw plates). You obviously need to print two of these sleeves, one for each side.

Instructions:

I cut the all thread to lengths I needed. You can use a Dremel or something similar (or an old school hacksaw). You will need to print two of the bolt_tube pieces (not the best name). They hold a nut captive. They are joined together around the nut and then tapped into the small hole on the side of the vise. The all-thread is then run down the length of the moving clamp arm and into the captive nut (put the two nuts on while running it through --discussed in a minute). I let the all-thread go all the way to the end of the inside of the clamp arm after running it through the captive nut.
The other end is cut to the length that allows for the wheel_washer and the wheel to mount to the end. These are tightened to act like the end of a bolt where they will turn the all-thread. Just put the captive nut in each one and turn each in opposite directions to lock them together.
Two nuts are tightened in opposite directions just on the inside of the clamp arm. These are used to allow the vise to come back open. I put a drop of super glue on the threads to make sure that the nuts always turn with the all-thread and don’t back out (don’t do this until you are sure it is together correctly). Make sure these are close to the wheel side of the clamp arm to avoid unnecessary slop.
The knobs are used to lock the vise in place around the cylinders. They each have a captive nut and the all-thread is cut just long enough to reach the cylinders. If you have trouble getting the nut snug into the hole, just put the all-thread through the hole, twist on the nut, and then use another nut on the other side of the knob and a crescent wrench to tighten the nut into the hole.
There are also clip-on jaw plates for the large vise and slide-on jaws for the small vise (These jaw plates are not shown in the pictures).
The first time things go together, some sanding may be necessary. Once you get the clamp arm into the base, you just have to slide it back and forth a bunch to get things to where they slide in and out easily. This assures a nice tight fit.

Print Settings

Printer:

Tronxy x3A

Resolution:

0.1 or 0.2

Infill:

20 - 30%


Notes:

I needed support on the wheel. Almost everything else should be good.
The clamp_arm needs support from the bed.

Post-Printing

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Comments deleted.

its cool but this student is cheating he is going to the engirnering page and asking people to like his thing so he gets a better grade sorry but dont cheat

Honestly, basing someones grade off of likes is ridiculous. How are people even supposed to find your design?? The only way people could see it is if they were specifically looking for a vice. It is a good design and I think a lot of people would like it if they saw it but if no one does your grade suffers? And some people don't bother clicking the like button. That grading system is ridiculous. Maybe the grade should be based off of how well the print comes out or how well the design works or something actually important like that. I would not call advertising your design cheating. (Also what did you use for CAD in your class)

The likes DOES NOT EFFECT THE GRADE, but is a portion of a contest. We are having a "Forged in Plastic" contest between the students for the vise project where 50% of the score is design, 25% print quality and 25% of the number of community likes. The winner receives a spool of PLA and bragging rights! That's it!

All of my student have passed the class with flying colors.

I did not want to totally dictate the scoring and thought that the community could help out. I also thought that the number of downloads could factor in but you can like something that may not be useful to you and therefore not download it.

My students are simply doing what I suggested. It is a contest and the winner will be determined by what they do to get the highest score.

If you want flame someone, then flame me!

Now I want to see links to the other students and their designs! Putting aside the issue of grading etc, I think it is great that you are teaching design like this. Is this a high-school, college, or other level course?

We work at Dynetics which is an R&D company and have our own Dynetics University which is basically engineers teaching engineers.

Searching on Vise or Vice and filtering the newest post will lead you to some of their work for the vise contest. Other designs were a paper clip and a door stop which was their first assignment. I asked them to post their work here on Thingiverse so that in their future this would become part of their way of sharing their designs. I myself, have gotten tons of great ideas from this forum and have posted many designs myself (Battman540)..

It is unfortunate that a simple mis-wording lead to a flame storm to me and my students. It was an honest mistake by them and myself.

I am reluctant to post their information after the fire storm but you and every one else can search on what I stated above to see what they accomplished.

But wait, there's more. I will be teaching this class at least two times a year for a while. So far it has been wildly popular and I expect the classes to be full within a few hours of the registration opening up. We are a fast paced, very energetic company that gets things done! I'm 63 tears old and I find it wonderful that I can teach these younger engineers things that will help them along in their careers not to mention all they have helped me learn along the way.

Kind of ironic, but the winner of the competition was the BEST VISE.

Thanks for the reply. No worries, it's all good. :-)

I hope that the class is about social media or social engineering, not any other kind of engineering. Just trying to keep my faith in humanity here, but they're sure not making it easy.

I used Design Spark Mechanical. And to be fair, the contest is based off of 50% design, 25% print quality, and 25% likes. And like you said... I advertised, I just thought it would be fun to post it and see what happened.

Who says that's cheating.
He said how many likes we get. He even suggested saying we are in a class.

The amazing part of this is that 10 weeks ago he had never printed a 3D object. In that time he has built his printer, learned how to print and also how to design in my class. Everyone had a blast from what I can tell.

All of my students built the Tronxy X3A printer. I showed them some build tricks and we also made a few mods as we built them. Once we had them dialed in we were getting some very good prints.

I'm hoping to post my build tricks in the Tronxy forum when I can get the time to clean them up.

Maybe teach him not to spam groups asking for likes for his project next time...

He is trying to win a contest between the other students.

Contests are all well and good. Spamming groups with messages to try and win your contest isn't. Especially in a setup like thingiverse has where we really can't block or even get rid of spam afterwards. Spam is wrong, period. and what I don't see here is an "oops, I'm sorry I didn't know I won't do that anymore". but rather the two of you trying to justify it as normal and perfectly fine because there was a contest? No! Especially given how much spam from the illegal TV recording crowd we have received in the past month. At best it was ignorant and tone deaf, and your continued support and justification of it is stupid.

You know.... What I saw was a lot of nice people that went and saw my design and made comments that they appreciated it and the effort that went into it. I had a lot of fun in the class. If you lived closer, I would recommend that you try taking it. Hope you have a nice day.

So many haters.

What an amazing vise. What'd that take? A couple of spools?

Would have liked it also without your comment ;-)

Comments deleted.

I made a jaw plate sleeve (I think I named it small_vise_sleevePads) for the small vise. They are fairly beefy and should hold up well.

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