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ArturoV

A Recorder Flute

by ArturoV May 21, 2013
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Does it actually play?

I don't think I just printed the reed and it dosent have the hole to play it

Had to rotate to vertical alignment (except the insert part) maybe you could produce a complete stl with all parts on one bed ready to print. I seperated the parts and added 6mm brims to the bottoms and printed all parts in 1 6hour print.

Why is the recorder classified as a Flute? It's more like a clarinet. Compare the 3.

A clarinet is an instrument that has a reed. This doesn't and that's why it's in the 'flute' classification.

Comments deleted.

I made this and it does not make noise

What is the minimum recommended infill percentage?

In Spanish it's called "flauta" not "flauto". Trust me, it's my mother tongue :)

Fe de erratas

Before I download this, is this is working model? Do I have to download all the parts or can I download and print the "complete " file?

theoretically it should work, although being honest I have not tested it

If you want one that has been tried and tested try /thing:12862

What you see here is basically how I started, with a model that looked the part but didn't work (/thing:11796), and after multiple iterations (and learning a ton about woodwind instruments) ended up with /thing:12862.

Recorder V2.3 (new Mouthpiece)
by cymon
Recorder (instrument)
by cymon

i believe what you have shown is a recorder, not a flute.

The instrument has many names: recorder in English, Blockflöte in German, flûte à bec in French, flauto dolce in Italian, and flauta dulce in Spanish. Up to the mid 18th century, when you referred to a flute, you nearly always were talking about a recorder - the transverse flute did not become the more common instrument until the late 18th - early 19th century. And it is classified as a flute because the vibrating medium is air (by creating vortices when breaking agains a sharp edge), as opposed to a vibrating reed for clarinet and other winds, vibrating lips for brass, and vibrating strings for, well, strings.