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madscifi

Tiny Toy Dump Truck

by madscifi Jun 29, 2011
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Made this for my 2yr old with a freshly assembled Anet A8 Priusa. Overall print worked well, the wheels/axles don't move but the dump hinges properly and my daughter loves it.

Just made one turned out perfect, now to scale it up and make it bigger.

Made this for my 3yo. I created a monster. He's coming to me "Daddy, print me another truck please"...

I made this for my 82 year old father who loves to build and paint things. He love it!

It is a great little truck!

Printing on an SD3 turned out mostly okay. Front axle was fine, rear axle however was quite stuck and would not move. Hinge for the container was moving immediately, but broke after a few uses. Suggestions: leave more space around wheel axles, and increase diameter of hinge.

Awesome. I'll print it for my nephew!

madscifi -- I printed your truck on my solidoodle. The final side of the pickup's bay is a straight 90 degree overhang. On my solidoodle it's all drooped but in your picture it's nice and straight. How did you pull that off? What printer are you using? Your STL design doesn't include a support or anything that I could see.

Thanks

The prints I posted were printed on a Sells-style Mendel. I'm not aware of anything that would prevent a Solidoodle from printing this without support.

You'll notice that I oriented the trucks in my pictures so that the inside of the bridged surface is not really visible - it was far from perfect. You'll also notice that most of the images of the truck that others have printed are oriented such that the inside of the bridged surface is not visible.

However, it is certainly possible to print a good copy without support. The trick is to tune Skienforge (assuming that is what you are using to generate gcode) for printing bridges well. The following Reprap forum thread is a good place to start: http://forums.reprap.org/read.php?1,83730http://forums.reprap.org/read....

Also, see: http://reprap.org/wiki/Calibration#Bridginghttp://reprap.org/wiki/Calibra...

It is well worth tweaking Skienforge to print bridges well on your printer. Many other models depend on well printed bridges - the various whistles being the most popular ones that come to mind first.

Thanks, I finally got all my settings worked out so it's printing well. I'm actually getting much better prints with Slic3r than Skeinforge.

Unfortunately, Slic3r is much less tolerant of design errors and when I try to slice your truck STL it reports, "The input file is not manifold." and "the model has overlapping or self-intersecting facets."

I tried opening in Netfabb Basic and it detected errors and auto-repaired. But it's repair
s break the design -- the wheels are no longer connected (no axel between them).

Is there any way you could fix the STL design so it doesn't have those errors? I'm really eager to get a nice truck printed. :)

Everything should be manifold now (at least according the Netfabb cloud service). Please let me know if there are any additional issues with the files.

It's still not working. I just ran it through Slic3r again and, "The model has overlapping or self-intersecting facets." It tries to auto-repair but the resulting gcode doesn't work. It won't even start printing with Pronterface.

I'm afraid I don't understand what is causing the self-intersecting facets or how to fix them. I've spent some time using Meshlab to identify the facets in question and trying to fix them without success (I can eliminate most but not all of them in Meshlab simply by checking the Unify Duplicated Vertices checkbox on import). It seems as if OpenSCAD is generating the mesh incorrectly from the csg, but I'm not certain of that at the moment. If anyone has any suggestions about how to fix these I would be most grateful.

I know this is a bit of an old topic. But I found out that OpenSCAD has tendency to generate wrong STL files if your "difference" selections have matching faces with the origonal mesh.

For example:
difference() { cube([20,20,20]); cube([10,10,10]); }
Can generate a wrong mesh (might not do so in this case)
But:
difference() { cube([20,20,20]); translate([-1,-1,-1]) cube([11,11,11]); }
Will always generate a good mesh.

I think I need a HBP, this just doesn't work too well with a raft. DONT_KNOW

PLA works without a HBP. Or, if you are using ABS, try an old CD that you want to destroy as a build surface. The ABS will stick to that pretty well without a HBP--sometimes too well.

Can anyone print it nicely at scaled down to 18mm? I tried and I obviously need a lot of bridge calibration. Also def. a smaller nozzle than .5mm

see more info here: http://omemon.wordpress.com/2011/07/01/smallest-size-test-thus-far/http://omemon.wordpress.com/20...

Thanks for posting the photo with the intermediate steps in the design process.

I'd so click your flattr button -- if you had one!

I have a policy of always flattr'ing designs that I print out, and I'd really like to do it in this case too! Please get a flattr account. :-)

Thanks for the suggestion. At the moment I'm of the opinion that the likes and seeing posted images of other's people's copies is more than enough flattery. That and I have some reservations about the way flattr is set up. I'll have to look at it in more detail.

I love the idea of printing fully-assembled objects with moving parts.

Once someone figures out a reliable and easy water soluble support material I think that fully assembled objects with moving parts will really take off. There would be a lot fewer limitations in the types of designs that would be practical.